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I am trying to use realloc function as making the array bigger as the user entered names. It gives me an error when I add 5. element, the error like : * glibc detected ./a.out: realloc(): invalid next size: 0x00000000017d2010 ** And the code is:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void){
  char **mtn = NULL;
  char x[30];
  int i = 0;

  while ( strcmp(gets(x), "finish") ){
    mtn = realloc( mtn, i*sizeof(char) );
   // mtn[i] = realloc( mtn[i], sizeof(x) ); // tried but didnt work
    mtn[i] = x;
    i++;
  }
  puts(mtn[1]);

  return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by H2CO3, ouah, WhozCraig, CoolBeans, tstenner Dec 22 '12 at 8:19

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2  
You multiply by one on the first pass through, then trample. Not good. Use realloc(mtn, (i+1) * sizeof(char *)). Note the changed sizeof(char *), too. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 22 '12 at 0:36
1  
Don't use gets(). Don't use gets() without checking its return value. Come to that, you should check the return value of realloc() too. The puts(mtn[1]) seems a trifle arbitrary too. You need to use strcpy() to copy strings; you need to allocate space for the string (as well as the pointer to the string, which you're currently doing). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 22 '12 at 0:37
1  
@KerrekSB probably at the "too localized" close vote... –  user529758 Dec 22 '12 at 0:41
1  
How about helping instead of being so rude @H2CO3 This is twice now I've seen you trolling the C questions, I think you need to read the rules on what that qualifies as "too localized" meta.stackexchange.com/questions/4818/… –  Doug Molineux Dec 22 '12 at 0:42
1  
Is it your intent to have N copies of the same address in your char* pointer array? if not, you must make want to allocate a new buffer for the actual string as well. –  WhozCraig Dec 22 '12 at 1:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char **mtn = NULL;
    char x[30];
    int i = 0;

    /* Never use gets, it's dangerous, use fgets instead */
    while (strcmp(fgets(x, sizeof(x), stdin), "finish\n")){
        /*
        your previous realloc was realloc(mtn, 0)
        and you have to take space for <char *>
        */
        mtn = realloc(mtn, (i + 1) * sizeof(char *));
        /* always check return of xalloc */
        if (mtn == NULL) {
            perror("realloc");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        /* you still need space for store x */
        mtn[i] = malloc(strlen(x) + 1);
        if (mtn[i] == NULL) {
            perror("malloc");
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        strcpy(mtn[i], x); /* mtn[i] = x is not valid */
        i++;
    }
    printf("%s", mtn[1]);
    /* always free xallocs in order to prevent memory leaks */
    while (i--) free(mtn[i]);
    free(mtn);
    return 0;
}
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