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// Situation 1 
var a = function A() { 
    this.x = 1;
    var b = function B () {
        this.x = 2;
        console.log('Method B : x = ' + this.x);
    };
    console.log('Method A : x = ' + this.x);
    b();
}

When I call a() , my result is

Method A : x = 1
Method B : x = 2

But if I delete "this.x = 2" as :

// Situation 2
var a = function A() { 
    this.x = 1;
    var b = function B () {
        console.log('Method B : x = ' + this.x);
    };
    console.log('Method A : x = ' + this.x);
    b();
}

My result will be

Method A : x = 1
Method B : x = 1

I don't understand why

  • In situation 2 : "this" of function B is referenced to "this" of function A

But

  • In situation 1 : "this.x" of function A isn't changed when assign "this.x = 2" in function B

My code runs on Chrome v23

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since, this.x = 2 is in the definition of function B, it doesn't take place until B is called, not when it's defined. Try this version and see:

// Situation 3
var a = function A() { 
    this.x = 1;
    var b = function B () {
        this.x = 2;
        console.log('Method B : x = ' + this.x);
    };
    console.log('Method A before B: x = ' + this.x);
    b();
    console.log('Method A after B: x = ' + this.x);
}
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  1. The reason this.x is being changed in both a and b is because they're both referencing the window object.

  2. I think you're having a misconception with this one; this.x is being changed after the call to b. We can see this if we reverse the calls:

    b(); // 2
    console.log('Method A : x = ' + this.x); // 2
    
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Calling b() like you do, will result in this referencing the global object (window within a browser environment).

That explains your behavior, your're writting basically window.x = 1;

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I think when assign "var a = function A()" , create function object A() . Then "this" in function A() reference to object A , but I don't understand why "this" reference to the global object ? –  Toan Nguyen Dec 22 '12 at 3:18
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You didn't call b() until after the value of A was printed. Therefore the value of x was 1 and THEN it was changed to 2 by b.

If you call b() before printing a() the output will be

Method A : x = 2
Method B : x = 2

As b() will first change value then a() will log

This is the function

var a = function A() { 
this.x = 1;
var b = function B () {
    this.x = 2;
    console.log('Method B : x = ' + this.x);
};
b();
    console.log('Method A : x = ' + this.x);

}

​Both a and b reference the window object window.x.

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this is a special keyword in javascript and it depends on the context. In your case function B() is in the context of function A(). So if you don't overwrite this.x in function B() it'll be the value you assigned in function A().

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