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I seem to be having a queer problem while getting user input within a for loop in go. Here is my code http://play.golang.org/p/r2ViReKCrl

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    var num int
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Printf("Debug: i : %d ", i)
        fmt.Scanf("%d", &num)
        fmt.Println(num)
    }
}

What happens when I run this code is this :

Debug: i : 0
Enter next number
1
1
Debug: i : 1
Enter next number
1
Debug: i : 2
Enter next number
2
2
Debug: i : 3
Enter next number
2
Debug: i : 4
Enter next number
3
3
Debug: i : 5
Enter next number
3
Debug: i : 6
Enter next number
4
4
Debug: i : 7
Enter next number
4
Debug: i : 8
Enter next number
5
5
Debug: i : 9
Enter next number
5

What I notice is that each iteration of the loop happens twice, Could this be because Go is using parallelism by default and causing both processors to run the code within a for loop?

share|improve this question
1  
As far as I can see, each iteration is done only once, Debug: i: n where n goes from 0 to 9 suggests exactly that. Or do you mean something else? Here is my session in the terminal: gist.github.com/4357860 It works exactly as expected. –  Vladimir Matveev Dec 22 '12 at 7:13
1  
How come your output doesn't match your code? –  jdi Dec 22 '12 at 7:36
    
@VladimirMatveev If you try to run it on your machine, i think youll see what I mean . Do you see the scanf in the loop? It should read a value from the keyboard 10 times. But for every input I give in, the loop block executes twice. So i increments twice. –  gprasant Dec 22 '12 at 8:20
    
@jdi Im confused about that too –  gprasant Dec 22 '12 at 8:26
1  
@gprasant, the link I gave holds the copy of terminal session on my computer with your program. It went exactly as your code suggests: print "Debug: i: $n " line -> awaiting number -> I enter the number -> it is printed -> repeat again. However, the output you have given cannot be produced by you program in principle; it can be produced by the program that peterSO has written in his answer. –  Vladimir Matveev Dec 22 '12 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What OS are you using? Windows?

Try this:

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    var num int
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Printf("Debug: i : %d\n", i)
        fmt.Println("Enter next number")
        n, err := fmt.Scanf("%d\n", &num)
        if err != nil {
            fmt.Println(n, err)
        }
        fmt.Println(num)
    }
}

Output:

Debug: i : 0
Enter next number
1
1
Debug: i : 1
Enter next number
2
2
Debug: i : 2
Enter next number
3
3
Debug: i : 3
Enter next number
4
4
Debug: i : 4
Enter next number
5
5
Debug: i : 5
Enter next number
6
6
Debug: i : 6
Enter next number
7
7
Debug: i : 7
Enter next number
8
8
Debug: i : 8
Enter next number
9
9
Debug: i : 9
Enter next number
10
10
share|improve this answer
    
Im using windows. I tried your suggestion. Im still having the same problem –  gprasant Dec 22 '12 at 8:24
    
Im sorry, I midded out the '\n' in fmt.Scanf("%d\n", &num) . I tried the scanfwith \n and it worked –  gprasant Dec 24 '12 at 2:36

The above answer is a good suggestion. the code

    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(n, err)
    }

will output the reason of this problem.

  10 unexpected newline

So I change the code to this, and it works.

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    var num int
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        fmt.Printf("Debug: i : %d ", i)
        fmt.Scanf("%d\n", &num) // add "\n"
        fmt.Println(num)
    }
}

this is because of the different line endings. the windows uses carriage return and line feed(\r\n) as a line ending. the Unix uses the line feed(\n).

you can use notepad2 to create a file (a.txt) with \r line feed. and do this:

  go run s.go < input.txt

this will work correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
it was a problem with the absense '\n' in the scanf. Is this a windows line ending problem? because I ran the same code above on a friend's mac and it worked perfectly –  gprasant Dec 24 '12 at 2:38
    
this is because of the different line endings. the windows uses carriage return and line feed('\r\n') as a line ending. the Unix uses the line feed('\n'). –  pexeer Dec 24 '12 at 5:00

Just to point out fmt.Scanln(&num) would probably work the same as fmt.Scanf("%d\n",&num), since fmt.Scanln(&num) also check the type of "num".

In other words, if

var num float32

fmt.Scanln(&num)

you can input floating number from the console.

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