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data=read.csv("filelocation",header=T,colClasses=c("Date","numeric")

  date   weight
2010-10-04 52495    
2010-10-01 53000    
2010-09-30 52916    
2010-09-29 52785    
2010-09-28 53348    
2010-09-27 52885    
2010-09-24 52174    
2010-09-23 51461    
2010-09-22 51286    
2010-09-21 50968    
2010-09-20 49250

data=data[order(data$date),]
diffweight1=weight-lag(weight,1)    

Hi guys,

I am am loading in time-series data into R for analysis. I am trying to lag one of the variables in order to difference the series. Unfortunately, the values of the differences variables all equal 0, because R wasn't successful at lagging the weight variable. I know I am supposed to use the as.ts(data$date) to specify that that "date" variable is a time series but every time I do so it changes the "date" variable into numeric numbers.Not to mention I thought I specified that the "date" column in the dataset was a time/date variable when I initially loaded it. How can I specify the data.frame as a time series? I appreciate any help. Thank you!!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try this:

library(zoo)

z <- read.zoo("filelocation", header = TRUE, sep = ",")
diff(z)
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Thank you for your response Grothen. "read.zoo" works if you have an xls file. It won't load csv files. Is there a "read.zoocsv" command? –  gabriel Dec 22 '12 at 19:36
    
@gabriel, read.zoo reads text files producing a zoo object. I have updated the answer to add sep = "," . –  G. Grothendieck Dec 22 '12 at 20:34
    
I see, so read.zoo reads only .txt files. What do you do then if you have a csv file? Then would the "xts" package, as outlined by agestudy, be the best method? Thank you! –  gabriel Dec 22 '12 at 20:48
    
@gabriel, A csv file is a text file. –  G. Grothendieck Dec 22 '12 at 21:09
    
Ah I see. I feel silly. The edit you made was really important because csv files(txt files) are comma separated. Hence the need for (sep = ","), Thank you for all your help and patience Grothen! –  gabriel Dec 22 '12 at 21:21

when you manipulate times series it is better to use (zoo or xts) packages. Many time series operations as lags, diff become very simple.

here an example using xts package ( I prefer this one)

# I read your data
dat <- read.table (text = 'date   weight
2010-10-04 52495    
2010-10-01 53000    
2010-09-30 52916    
2010-09-29 52785    
2010-09-28 53348    
2010-09-27 52885    
2010-09-24 52174    
2010-09-23 51461    
2010-09-22 51286    
2010-09-21 50968    
2010-09-20 49250',header=TRUE)
# I construct my xts object
dat.xts <- xts(dat$weight,order.by=as.POSIXct(dat$date))
# new 2 columns withs lags(1) and diff

merge(dat.xts, ll = lag(dat.xts),dd =diff(dat.xts))
           dat.xts    ll   dd
2010-09-20   49250    NA   NA
2010-09-21   50968 49250 1718
2010-09-22   51286 50968  318
2010-09-23   51461 51286  175
2010-09-24   52174 51461  713
2010-09-27   52885 52174  711
2010-09-28   53348 52885  463
2010-09-29   52785 53348 -563
2010-09-30   52916 52785  131
2010-10-01   53000 52916   84
2010-10-04   52495 53000 -505
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Thank you agestudy! It seems from your code that R only recognizes a time-series data is in fact truly time-series is if the "date" variable has a time specified in it. Am I correct? Your command "as.POSIXct(dat$date)" essentially forced the date variable to have time/(hours,mins,secs) connected to the variable? –  gabriel Dec 22 '12 at 19:53
    
I also noticed that by using the xts package the data I was using no longer became a data.frame. –  gabriel Dec 22 '12 at 19:54

What I feel you need is difference between adjacent rows for weight col You can try :

weight <- c(20,40,70,110)
diff(weight)
[1] 20 30 40

since 40 - 20 = 20, 70 - 40 = 30 and so on similarly try difftime for time series in case you need that

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Time-series objects are designed to track data sampled at equally spaced points in time. You have an uneven sampling interval, but ts(data) seems to do what you're looking for.

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