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I'm trying to make a function that will graph whatever formula I tell it to.

import numpy as np  
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt  
def graph(formula, x_range):  
    x = np.array(x_range)  
    y = formula  
    plt.plot(x, y)  
    plt.show()  

When I try to call it the following error happens, I believe it's trying to do the multiplication before it gets to y = formula.

graph(x**3+2*x-4, range(-10, 11))

Traceback (most recent call last):  
  File "<pyshell#23>", line 1, in <module>  
    graph(x**3+2*x-4, range(-10, 11))  
NameError: name 'x' is not defined  
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is because in line

graph(x**3+2*x-4, range(-10, 11))

x is not defined.

The easiest way is to pass the function you want to plot as a string and use eval to evaluate it as an expression.

So your code with minimal modifications will be

import numpy as np  
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt  
def graph(formula, x_range):  
    x = np.array(x_range)  
    y = eval(formula)
    plt.plot(x, y)  
    plt.show()

and you can call it as

graph('x**3+2*x-4', range(-10, 11))
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there's no need at all to use eval here, and it adds overhead –  goncalopp Dec 22 '12 at 6:41
    
thank you that worked perfectly. thought that might be the case but had no idea how to un-string it –  Åthenå Dec 22 '12 at 6:42
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Your guess is right: the code is trying to evaluate x**3+2*x-4 immediately. Unfortunately you can't really prevent it from doing so. The good news is that in Python, functions are first-class objects, by which I mean that you can treat them like any other variable. So to fix your function, we could do:

import numpy as np  
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt  

def graph(formula, x_range):  
    x = np.array(x_range)  
    y = formula(x)  # <- note now we're calling the function 'formula' with x
    plt.plot(x, y)  
    plt.show()  

def my_formula(x):
    return x**3+2*x-4

graph(my_formula, range(-10, 11))

If you wanted to do it all in one line, you could use what's called a lambda function, which is just a short function without a name where you don't use def or return:

graph(lambda x: x**3+2*x-4, range(-10, 11))

And instead of range, you can look at np.arange (which allows for non-integer increments), and np.linspace, which allows you to specify the start, stop, and the number of points to use.

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thanks for the help –  Åthenå Dec 22 '12 at 6:50
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