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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc,char* argv[]){
    if(argv[1] == ""){
        cout << "please put something" << endl;
    }else if(argv[1] == "string"){
        cout << "yeah string" << endl;
    }else if(argv[1] == "integer"){
        cout << "yeah integer" << endl;
    }
}

I don't know what's wrong: I try to check if argument supplied for argv[1] is empty so it will be false and application will exit, so please tell me what is wrong in my code.

share|improve this question
    
Are you aware of strcmp and strlen? –  Alok Save Dec 22 '12 at 10:59
    
i'm new into c++ world, so not much info i know about function in c++, most of the time i use php in my coding, but now i plan to learn c++.. –  Mohd Shahril Dec 22 '12 at 11:13
2  
Oh I was under the impression you are a c programmer moving to c++, but no. So scratch my first comment. Don't learn strcpy & strlen learn std::string instead. :) –  Alok Save Dec 22 '12 at 11:15
    
other people answers make me understand what i wrong, btw thank also to you.. :) –  Mohd Shahril Dec 22 '12 at 11:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Everybody is giving you a different answer. And in fact everybody is right.

The signature of main, int main(int argc, char *argv[]) is inherited from C. In C strings are pointer to char. When you use operator== on them, you only compare pointer value.

The C way to compare string content is to use strcmp.

if (strcmp(argv[1], "integer") == 0){

It is safer and easier for you to do it the C++ way.

if (std::string(argv[1]) == "integer"){

This line create a temporary std::string from argv[1]. you must include string for this to work.

Finally check if argc == 2 in order to know if an argument was supplied. It is true that argv is null terminated by the standard 3.6.1 but it definitely make things clearer to check that argv is indeed equal to 2.

share|improve this answer
1  
so we need to convert char into string before we do comparison, thank for nice example and answers.. :) –  Mohd Shahril Dec 22 '12 at 11:24

If you want to code in C++ you can use std::string, include its header:

#include <string>

Convert the first argument to std::string and use its operator==:

std::string first = argv[1];

if(first == ""){
    cout << "please put something" << endl;
}else if(first == "string"){
    cout << "yeah string" << endl;
}else if(first == "integer"){
    cout << "yeah integer" << endl;
}

Comparison of char * to string literals doesn't make sense, if you make a std::string out of argv[1] then it's a different story, it will work as you expected.

But, you should check the number of arguments supplied to the program by the user first, it's in argc.

share|improve this answer
    
i thought argv[1] is string (because result is in string), but now i know it, thank.. :) –  Mohd Shahril Dec 22 '12 at 11:27

Can't use == for argv[] as it's char* type, use strcmp instead.

int main(int argc, char*argv[])
{
    if(argc == 1){
        cout << "please put something" << endl;
    }else if(strcmp(argv[1], "string") == 0){
        cout << "yeah string" << endl;
    }else if (strcmp(argv[1], "integer") == 0){
        cout << "yeah integer" << endl;
    }
  return 0;
}

Or you need to make a copy of argv[1] to std::string then you can use == operator.

share|improve this answer
    
nice example about strcmp function, thank :) –  Mohd Shahril Dec 22 '12 at 11:26

First check if argc > 1. Otherwise, you're accessing an invalid memory.

if(argc < 2){
    cout << "please put something" << endl;
}else if(argv[1] == "string"){
    cout << "yeah string" << endl;
}else if(argv[1] == "integer"){
    cout << "yeah integer" << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
"Otherwise, you're accessing an invalid memory." - Nope, since argv is NULL-terminated - even if there are no arguments, argv[1] is valid, it's just NULL. –  user529758 Dec 22 '12 at 11:09
    
so if i make string(argv[1]) == NULL it's make sense or not ? –  Mohd Shahril Dec 22 '12 at 11:27
    
(string(argv[1]) == NULL) works exactly the same as (argc < 2). The reason is that in standard C, the last value of the argv array is always NULL. That is as long as your compiler implements the standard... –  grebulon Dec 22 '12 at 16:45

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