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Take a look at this class:

A=class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create(A:Integer);overload;  
  constructor Create(A,B:Integer);overload;  
end;

Now when we want to use the class:

var  
  test:A;  
begin  
  test:=A.Create; //this constructor is still visible and usable!  
end;

Can anyone help me with hiding this constructor? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to? What are you trying to achieve? –  Marjan Venema Dec 22 '12 at 13:33
1  
+1. I thought this had been asked about before, but the only question I found wasn't expressed nearly as succinctly as this. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 22 '12 at 13:33
    
@Marjan Venema:It's obvious that I want to make a standard class, and my class shouldn't have this default constructor. –  Javid Dec 22 '12 at 13:43
1  
I tend not to fight the language/framework I am working with. Just declare it with reintroduce (effectively hiding the default one). Have it throw an exception and/or mark it deprecated? If the compiler accepts the deprecated on it, then you will get compile time warnings and otherwise run time exceptions. But I see David has just expanded his answer with some interesting ideas. –  Marjan Venema Dec 22 '12 at 13:46
    
Deprecated is quite nice. You can get the compiler to block on that. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 13:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

So long as you have overloaded constructors named Create, you cannot hide the parameterless TObject constructor when deriving from TObject.

This is discussed here: http://www.yanniel.info/2011/08/hide-tobject-create-constructor-delphi.html

If you are prepared to put another class between your class and TObject you can use Andy Hausladen's trick:

TNoParameterlessContructorObject = class(TObject)
strict private
  constructor Create;
end;

A = class(TNoParameterlessContructorObject)
public
  constructor Create(A:Integer);overload;  
  constructor Create(A,B:Integer);overload;  
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Is there something special about Create or TObject, or does this rule generalize to all overloaded methods with the same name as non-overloaded, non-virtual base methods? –  Rob Kennedy Dec 22 '12 at 13:36
2  
It is general. Any overloaded method in a derived class (and that is every class) automatically makes the inherited method overloaded, too. –  Uwe Raabe Dec 22 '12 at 13:41
    
@Rob So far as I can tell, there's nothing special about constructors, Create, TObject. The same behaviour can be reproduces with ordinary methods. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '12 at 13:42

You can hide the inherited Create by just introducing a non overloaded Create. As you need two overloaded Create, you can either merge those into one Create with an optional second parameter:

A=class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create(A:Integer; B: Integer = 0); 
end;

or, if this is not feasible, you can introduce an intermediate class introducing the first create and then the final class with the overloaded second one:

preA=class(TObject)  
public  
  constructor Create(A:Integer); 
end;

A=class(preA)  
public  
  constructor Create(A,B:Integer);overload;  
end;
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