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MySQL seems to be unable to optimise a select with a GROUP BY subquery and ends up in long execution times. There must be a known optimisation for such common scenario.

Let's assume that we're trying to return all orders from the database, with a flag indicating if it is the first order for the customer.

CREATE TABLE orders (order int, customer int, date date);

Retrieving the first orders by customer is superfast.

SELECT customer, min(order) as first_order FROM orders GROUP BY customer;

However, it becomes very slow once we join this with the full order set using a subquery

SELECT order, first_order FROM orders LEFT JOIN ( 
  SELECT customer, min(order) as first_order FROM orders GROUP BY customer
) AS first_orders ON orders.order=first_orders.first_order;

I hope there is a simple trick that we're missing, because otherwise it would be about 1000x faster to do

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_first_order AS 
  SELECT customer, min(order) as first_order FROM orders GROUP BY customer;
CREATE INDEX tmp_boost ON tmp_first_order (first_order)

SELECT order, first_order FROM orders LEFT JOIN tmp_first_order 
  ON orders.order=tmp_first_order.first_order;

EDIT:
Inspired by @ruakh proposed option 3, there is indeed a less ugly workaround using INNER JOIN and UNION, which has acceptable performance yet does not require temporary tables. However, it is a bit specific to our case and I am wondering if a more generic optimisation exists.

SELECT order, "YES" as first FROM orders INNER JOIN ( 
    SELECT min(order) as first_order FROM orders GROUP BY customer
  ) AS first_orders_1 ON orders.order=first_orders_1.first_order
UNION
SELECT order, "NO" as first FROM orders INNER JOIN ( 
    SELECT customer, min(order) as first_order FROM orders GROUP BY customer
  ) AS first_orders_2 ON first_orders_2.customer = orders.customer 
    AND orders.order > first_orders_2.first_order;
share|improve this question
    
A few ideas: analyze execution plan (explain query); an index; a subquery instead of a left join. –  full.stack.ex Dec 22 '12 at 17:03
    
kristox, did you check my answer? –  Peter Lang Dec 22 '12 at 20:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here are a few things you might try:

  1. Removing customer from the subquery's field-list, since it's not doing anything anyway:

    SELECT order,
           first_order
      FROM orders
      LEFT
      JOIN ( SELECT MIN(order) AS first_order
               FROM orders
              GROUP
                 BY customer
           ) AS first_orders
        ON orders.order = first_orders.first_order
    ;
    
  2. Conversely, adding customer to the ON clause, so it actually does something for you:

    SELECT order,
           first_order
      FROM orders
      LEFT
      JOIN ( SELECT customer,
                    MIN(order) AS first_order
               FROM orders
              GROUP
                 BY customer
           ) AS first_orders
        ON orders.customer = first_orders.customer
       AND orders.order = first_orders.first_order
    ;
    
  3. Same as previous, but using an INNER JOIN instead of a LEFT JOIN, and converting your original ON clause into a CASE expression:

    SELECT order,
           CASE WHEN first_order = order THEN first_order END AS first_order
      FROM orders
     INNER
      JOIN ( SELECT customer,
                    MIN(order) AS first_order
               FROM orders
              GROUP
                 BY customer
           ) AS first_orders
        ON orders.customer = first_orders.customer
    ;
    
  4. Replacing the whole JOIN approach with an uncorrelated IN-subquery in a CASE expression:

    SELECT order,
           CASE WHEN order IN
                      ( SELECT MIN(order)
                          FROM orders
                         GROUP
                            BY customer
                      )
                THEN order
            END AS first_order
      FROM orders
    ;
    
  5. Replacing the whole JOIN approach with a correlated EXISTS-subquery in a CASE expression:

    SELECT order,
           CASE WHEN NOT EXISTS
                      ( SELECT 1
                          FROM orders AS o2
                         WHERE o2.customer = o1.customer
                           AND o2.order < o1.order
                      )
                THEN order
            END AS first_order
      FROM orders AS o1
    ;
    

(It's very likely that some of the above will actually perform worse, but I think they're all worth trying.)

share|improve this answer
    
what an awesome answer... –  mmhasannn Dec 22 '12 at 17:24
    
Good answer @ruakh. Option 3 is interesting, however in your example it will only return the first orders. I.e. if you have 100 customers and 2000 orders, then this will only return the 100 first orders. Inspired by your suggestion I have tried something with UNION that seems to work. –  kristox Dec 22 '12 at 18:17
    
@kristox: Re: "if you have 100 customers and 2000 orders, then [option 3] will only return the 100 first orders": That's not true. Are you sure you copied the ON clause correctly? –  ruakh Dec 22 '12 at 18:29
    
@ruakh you are right and I was wrong. Tried out option 3 and it works well. Thanks. –  kristox Dec 22 '12 at 20:33
    
@kristox: You're welcome! –  ruakh Dec 22 '12 at 20:47

I would expect this to be faster when using a variable instead of the LEFT JOIN:

SELECT
  `order`,
  If(@previous_customer<>(@previous_customer:=`customer`),
    `order`,
    NULL
  ) AS first_order
FROM orders
JOIN ( SELECT @previous_customer := -1 ) x
ORDER BY customer, `order`;

That's what my example on SQL Fiddle returns:

CUSTOMER    ORDER    FIRST_ORDER
1           1        1
1           2        (null)
1           3        (null)
2           4        4
2           5        (null)
3           6        6
4           7        7
share|improve this answer
    
Section 9.4 of the MySQL Reference Manual recommends against "assign[ing] a value to a user variable and read[ing] the value within the same statement", on the grounds that you can't guarantee that it will always give the results you expect (in the presence of changing MySQL versions, changing execution-plans, and so on). –  ruakh Dec 22 '12 at 20:54

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