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I have some set of bash functions which output some information:

  • find-modelname-in-epson-ppds
  • find-modelname-in-samsung-ppds
  • find-modelname-in-hp-ppds
  • etc ...

I've been writing functions which read output and filter it:

function filter-epson {
    find-modelname-in-epson-ppds | sed <bla-blah-blah>
}

function filter-hp {
    find-modelname-in-hp-ppds | sed <the same bla-blah-blah>
}
etc ...

But the I thought that it would be better do something like this:

function filter-general {
    (somehow get input) | sed <bla-blah-blah>
}

and then call in another high-level functions:

function high-level-func {
    # outputs filtered information
    find-modelname-in-hp/epson/...-ppds | filter-general 
}

How can I achieve that with the best bash practices?

share|improve this question
    
If you're looking for good practice, you can already replace function fname with fname(). – gniourf_gniourf Dec 22 '12 at 17:18
    
What's the difference? Only the brevity? But I think definition with function looks more expressive, isn't it? – likern Dec 22 '12 at 17:22
1  
What do you mean by more expressive? In this link you'll see that it's obsolete and deprecated (and not POSIX). – gniourf_gniourf Dec 22 '12 at 17:25
1  
What do your functions find-modelname-... really look like and do? Maybe you should tell us more so that we can advice the best option. You're clearly trying to factor some pieces of code, but we need to know what it is exactly. – gniourf_gniourf Dec 22 '12 at 17:34
    
@gniourf_gniourf the link you reference says function fname { ... } is fine. What's deprecated is function fname() {...} – bames53 Oct 3 '13 at 15:54
up vote 16 down vote accepted

If the question is How do I pass stdin to a bash function?, then the answer is:

Shellscript functions take stdin the ordinary way, as if they were commands or programs. :)

input.txt:

HELLO WORLD
HELLO BOB
NO MATCH

test.sh:

#!/bin/sh

myfunction() {
    grep HELLO
}

cat input.txt | myfunction

Output:

hobbes@metalbaby:~/scratch$ ./test.sh 
 HELLO WORLD 
 HELLO BOB 

Note that command line arguments are ALSO handled in the ordinary way, like this:

test2.sh:

#!/bin/sh

myfunction() {
    grep "$1"
}

cat input.txt | myfunction BOB

Output:

hobbes@metalbaby:~/scratch/$ ./test2.sh 
 HELLO BOB 
share|improve this answer
    
This does not work on bash 4.1.0. I get the output: " HELLO WORLD \n HELLO BOB \n NO MATCH" – DocSalvager Dec 5 '14 at 10:43
    
Ok, it's because of my usage of \n in the input string. I've edited the answer; it now just cats an input file, for the sake of simplicity. This question is about accessing stdin from a function--and that part works even in bash 2.05b. :) – daveloyall Dec 5 '14 at 19:10
1  
Ah, yes... because echo does not support escape sequences. Another way to handle that is define a variable like NL="<hit Enter here>" and replace "\n" with "$NL". Working now. Thanks! – DocSalvager Dec 6 '14 at 8:11

To be painfully explicit that I'm piping from stdin, I sometimes write

cat - | ...
share|improve this answer
1  
Congratulations on being granted this award – Bklyn Oct 16 '14 at 15:55
    
In my case, indeed I needed to be "painfully explicit", otherwise it didn't work. – Mahdi Oct 27 '14 at 10:29
    
@Mahdi What do you mean? Are there shells out there which require the use of cat - in this case/context? Which? When? How? – 7heo.tk May 21 '15 at 23:30
    
I have a script that runs as a mapper in a Hadoop map-reduce job, and the input contents are given to me via stdin. I needed to read the whole input into a file for further processing, and this solution worked for me. – Mahdi May 24 '15 at 12:13

Call sed directly. That's it.

function filter-general {
    sed <bla-blah-blah>
}
share|improve this answer

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