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Is there a way to define a recursive type in closure compiler's typing syntax? In other words, could I define a type that includes itself in its definition?

/**
 * A node on the tree.
 * @type {{left: (Tree|null)}}
 */
var Tree = {
    left: null
};

(side note: yes, this definition of a tree is wrong)

Although the above compiles with simple optimizations, it fails with advanced throwing the following error:

JSC_TYPE_PARSE_ERROR: Bad type annotation. Unknown type Tree at line 3 character 17 * @type {{left: (Tree|null)}}

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just a guess but can you put the type over the left part.

/**
 * Not sure what goes here
 */
var Tree = {
    /**
     * @type {Tree}
     */
    left: null
};

Also don't you need a constructor for a type

/**
 * @constructor
 */
var Tree = function(){

    this.left = new Tree()
};

/**
 * @type {Tree}
 */
Tree.prototype.left = null;

Just so you know, you've now got infinite recursion if you instantiate the type with

var test = new Tree();
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Huh. Apparently I completely misunderstood how the @type parameter works, thanks! (also, I think the idea is to simply define a valid construction rather than writing executable code: this.left should be null in the constructor ... then again, I'm the one stumbling over simple syntax) – Casey Dec 22 '12 at 18:12
    
Alright, well hope it helps. – Ally Dec 22 '12 at 18:22
    
Also the reason why I don't use 'Tree.prototype.left = new Tree()' is because if you do that, then every object you create of type tree, the 'left' property will always refer to the same instance of Tree. By instantiating it in the constructor you get a new instance of Tree for the 'left' property every time you instantiate a new type. Hope I didn't make that explanation more complicated than it needed to be. – Ally Dec 22 '12 at 18:25
1  
Instantiating a new Tree in the Tree constructor is a fool-proof way to create a stack overflow :-) – Bergi Dec 22 '12 at 19:42
    
You are indeed correct. :) – Ally Dec 23 '12 at 5:12

/** * @typedef{{left:Tree}} */ var Tree;

or

/** * @interface */ var Tree =function(){}

/** @type {Tree} */ Tree.prototype.left;

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