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I use the example from the sampleSelection package

## Greene( 2003 ): example 22.8, page 786
    data( Mroz87 )
    Mroz87$kids  <- ( Mroz87$kids5 + Mroz87$kids618 > 0 )
    # Two-step estimation
    test1  = heckit( lfp ~ age + I( age^2 ) + faminc + kids + educ,
                     wage ~ exper + I( exper^2 ) + educ + city, Mroz87 ) 
    # ML estimation
    test2 =  selection( lfp ~ age + I( age^2 ) + faminc + kids + educ,
                        wage ~ exper + I( exper^2 ) + educ + city, Mroz87 ) 
    pr2 <- predict(test2,Mroz87)
    pr1 <- predict(test1,Mroz87)

My problem is that the predict function does not work. I get this error:

    Error in UseMethod("predict") : 
  no applicable method for 'predict' applied to an object of class "c('selection', 'maxLik', 'maxim', 'list')"

The predict function works for many models so I wonder why I get an error for heckman regression models.

-----------UPDATE----------- I made some progress but I still need your help. I build an original heckman model for comparsion:

data( Mroz87 )
Mroz87$kids  <- ( Mroz87$kids5 + Mroz87$kids618 > 0 )
test1  = heckit( lfp ~ age + I( age^2 ) + faminc + kids + educ,
                 wage ~ exper + I( exper^2 ) + educ + city, Mroz87[1:600,] ) 

After that I start building it on my own. Heckman model requires a selection equation:

zi* = wi γ + ui
where zi =1 if zi* >0  and zi = 0 if zi* <=0
after you calculate yi = xi*beta +ei ONLY for the cases where zi*>0

I build the probit model first:

library(MASS)
#probit1 = probit(lfp ~ age + I( age^2 ) + faminc + kids + educ, Mroz87, x = TRUE, print.level = print.level -      1, iterlim = 30)
myprobit <- glm(lfp ~ age + I( age^2 ) + faminc + kids + educ, family = binomial(link = "probit"), 
                data = Mroz87[1:600,])
summary(myprobit)

The model is exactly the same just as with the heckit command.

Then I build a lm model:

#get predictions for the variables (the data is not needed but I specify it anyway)
selectvar <- predict(myprobit,data = Mroz87[1:600,])
#bind the prediction to the table (I build a new one in my case)
newdata = cbind(Mroz87[1:600,],selectvar)
#Build an lm model for the subset where zi>0
lm1 = lm(wage ~ exper + I( exper^2 ) + educ + city , newdata, subset = selectvar > 0)
summary(lm1)

My issue now is that the lm model does not much the one created by heckit. I have no idea why. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
There is no predict.selection function. – 42- Dec 22 '12 at 20:42
    
Thanks DWin. Is there any way that I can do it myself? Maybe use the probit for the selection model, and then use it with the lm function? Then predict should function. So basically I'll use probit to produce a model, and then use predict for this model and apply it as a variable when creating the lm model. Could that work? – Michael Dec 22 '12 at 20:47
    
Does it make sense to predict the lm object contained in the selection object, i.e. predict(test2$twoStep$lm)? – pistachionut Dec 22 '12 at 20:51
    
It works that way but it is still a problem when I use the model to predict new data. For example say that the first 10 rows in the table were our testing sample. If I were to run predict(test2$twoStep$lm,Mroz87[1:10,]) then I get a warning Warning message: 'newdata' had 10 rows but variable(s) found have 753 rows and it returns me 753 rows instead of 10 that I requested. – Michael Dec 23 '12 at 8:47
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Implementation

Here is an implementation of the predict.selection function -- it produces 4 different types of predictions (which are explained here):

library(Formula)
library(sampleSelection)
predict.selection = function(objSelection, dfPred, 
                                 type = c('link', 'prob', 'cond', 'uncond')) {

  # construct the Formula object
  tempS = evalq(objSelection$call$selection)
  tempO = evalq(objSelection$call$outcome)

  FormHeck = as.Formula(paste0(tempO[2], '|', tempS[2], '~', tempO[3], '|', tempS[3]))

  # regressor matrix for the selection equation
  mXSelection = model.matrix(FormHeck, data = dfPred, rhs = 2)

  # regressor matrix for the outcome equation
  mXOutcome = model.matrix(FormHeck, data = dfPred, rhs = 1)

  # indices of the various parameters in selectionObject$estimate
  vIndexBetaS = objSelection$param$index$betaS
  vIndexBetaO = objSelection$param$index$betaO
  vIndexErr = objSelection$param$index$errTerms

  # get the estimates
  vBetaS = objSelection$estimate[vIndexBetaS]
  vBetaO = objSelection$estimate[vIndexBetaO]

  dLambda = objSelection$estimate[vIndexErr['rho']]*
    objSelection$estimate[vIndexErr['sigma']]

  # depending on the type of prediction requested, return
  # TODO allow the return of multiple prediction types
  pred = switch(type, 
         link = mXSelection %*% vBetaS,
         prob = pnorm(mXSelection %*% vBetaS),
         uncond = mXOutcome %*% vBetaO,
         cond = mXOutcome %*% vBetaO + 
           dnorm(temp <- mXSelection %*% vBetaS)/pnorm(temp) * dLambda)
  return(pred)
}

Test

Suppose you estimate the following Heckman sample selection model using MLE:

data(Mroz87)

# define a new variable
Mroz87$kids  = (Mroz87$kids5 + Mroz87$kids618 > 0)

# create the estimation sample
Mroz87Est = Mroz87[1:600, ]

# create the hold out sample
Mroz87Holdout = Mroz87[601:nrow(Mroz87), ]

# estimate the model using MLE
heckML =  selection(selection = lfp ~ age + I(age^2) + faminc + kids + educ,
                    outcome = wage ~ exper + I(exper^2) + educ + city, data = Mroz87Est) 
summary(heckML)  

The different types of predictions are computed as below:

vProb = predict(objSelection = heckML, dfPred = Mroz87Holdout, type = 'prob')
vLink = predict(objSelection = heckML, dfPred = Mroz87Holdout, type = 'link')
vCond = predict(objSelection = heckML, dfPred = Mroz87Holdout, type = 'cond')
vUncond = predict(objSelection = heckML, dfPred = Mroz87Holdout, type = 'uncond')

You can verify these computation on a platform that produces these outputs, such as Stata.

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