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I'd like to have a singleton in my system but rather than have callers access it via some kind of 'sharedInstance' method, I'd like them to be able to be unaware that they are using a singleton, in other words, I'd like the callers to be able to say:

MyClass *dontKnowItsASingleton = [[MyClass alloc] init];

To accomplish this, I've tried overriding alloc as follows:

// MyClass.m

static MyClass *_sharedInstance;

+ (id)alloc {

    if (!_sharedInstance) {
        _sharedInstance = [super alloc];
    }
    return _sharedInstance;
}

My question is: is this okay? It seems to work, but I've never overridden alloc before. Also, if it's okay, could I always use this technique, rather than dispatch_once approach I have been doing? ...

+ (id)sharedInstance {

    static SnappyTV *_sharedInstance = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        _sharedInstance = [[self alloc] init];
    });
    return _sharedInstance;
}
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4  
It seems fine, however I'm not sure about thread safety. (Minor terminology fixup: you subclass a class, e. g. NSObject, when you redefine a method, that's called "overriding".) –  user529758 Dec 22 '12 at 20:57
    
@H2CO3 Made an edit. –  NSAddict Dec 22 '12 at 21:07
    
alloc actually calls allocWithZone:, you should probably over ride that. –  estobbart Dec 22 '12 at 21:59
    
@danh Keep in mind that this means init will be called repeatedly on the same object. If you're using ARC, multiple calls to init on the same object is undefined behavior. Even if that's ok with you (other classes like NSString do it), make sure your init method handles being called repeatedly. –  rob mayoff Dec 22 '12 at 22:16
    
wow. excellent point, Rob. I'm going to post an answer with these suggestions for others to find –  danh Dec 22 '12 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As @H2CO3 mentioned, your method of going about producing singletons is acceptable, however not threadsafe. The more traditional approach is to wrap your assignment and comparison in an @synchronized block so multiple thread access is reduced, however overriding +alloc is not the best way of going about implementing an already shaky pattern.

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I always think about rewriting singletons as class methods, however it feels quirky. I don't like class methods. –  user529758 Dec 22 '12 at 21:05
    
@H2CO3 Well that's what they should be. I guess this variation of the pattern unsettles me because you can easily get confused as to what is a singleton and what isn't without seeing the code properly. I guess it's useful in some rare edge-case situations, but... –  CodaFi Dec 22 '12 at 21:06
    
Okay - thanks @CodaFi. Is it okay to use the class itself as the lock token? –  danh Dec 22 '12 at 21:20
    
self is sufficient. I don't believe you can literally use the class as the lock token without some ugly casting. –  CodaFi Dec 22 '12 at 21:21
    
Great. Thanks much. (self is the class in +alloc) –  danh Dec 22 '12 at 21:26

I think that you should take advantage of the initialize method:

+ (void) initialize
{
    _sharedInstance= [[self alloc]init];
}


+ (id)sharedInstance 
{
    return _sharedIntsance;
}
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The problem with this is that +initialize can be called multiple times (implicitly of course). And I do hope _sharedInstance is a static global and that you are checking for it's existance, otherwise you'll have an N-ton. –  CodaFi Dec 22 '12 at 21:11
    
initialize gets called once by the runtime, then if a programmer seeks troubles instead of calling initialize can do this: strcpy(0,"Crash"); –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Dec 22 '12 at 21:17
    
Perhaps you should see this then stackoverflow.com/questions/3910187/… –  CodaFi Dec 22 '12 at 21:19
    
Thanks @Ramy - also, I'm looking for a safe way to let outsiders use alloc and still have a singleton. Not sure I see how this addresses that. –  danh Dec 22 '12 at 21:19

In case others come looking, here's a solution that I think integrates all of the good advice:

+ (id)alloc {

    @synchronized(self) {
        if (!_sharedInstance) {
            _sharedInstance = [super alloc];
        }
        return _sharedInstance;
    }
}

- (id)init {

    @synchronized(self) {
        static BOOL init = NO;
        if (!init) {
            init = YES;
            self = [super init];
        }
    }
    return self;
}

Thanks to @H2CO3 for the thread safety issue, @CodaFi for the thread safety prescription and to @Rob Mayoff for dangers with init under arc. I got helped by the best and the brightest today!

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