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Power set and Cartesian Product of a set python

With Python Itertools.permutations() I would like to receive and output of permutations with repeating characters. For an example this my function below and its current output.

def perm(n,i):
    b = 0
    while b < n:
        n= n -1
        from itertools import permutations as p
        file.write('\n'.join([''.join(item) for item in p(i,n)]))
perm(4,'0123')

the output is:

012
013
021
023
031
032
102
103
120
123
130
132
201
203
210
213
230
231
301
302
310
312
320
321.....

how would I get an output like 112 or 222?

from what I understand combinations are not order specific where permutations are. what I am looking for is finding all combinations then every permutation for each combination. Is this possible?

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marked as duplicate by Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Peter O., Dharmendra, Fahim Parkar, AVD Dec 23 '12 at 7:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Why import permutations each time in the loop? And why the ; extended line? You could clean that up at least.. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 22 '12 at 21:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't want permutations at all. You want the cartesian product:

import itertools

def perm(n, seq):
    for p in itertools.product(seq, repeat=n):
        file.write("".join(p))
        file.write("\n")

perm(4, "0123")
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Thank you much exactly what I am looking for –  John K Dec 22 '12 at 22:16

What you seem to be looking for is a Cartesian product, not a permutation, which is also provided by itertools.

You might do well to familiarize yourself with the differences between permutation, combination, combination with replacement, and Cartesian product to decide what works best your application, but chances are, you're looking for another of the options.

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I thought that for a second too, but the OP seems to want both 012 and 102 -- or at least he didn't comment on it in his list -- in which case he's probably after itertools.product. –  DSM Dec 22 '12 at 22:04
    
Yes, I think you're right. I'll edit. –  acjay Dec 22 '12 at 22:04

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