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In my C program I am receiving input which is of the form

     "name,age,salary|Richard,35,10000"

Now I want to frame insert and update queries from this input.

I am using strtok_r and strtok for this purpose.

But my problem is that while inserting or updating, I have to use double quotes around varchar data type like "Richard".

The input does not have a fixed pattern and it can be in any sequence.

  • Do I have to check for the data type of each and every column every time?

  • Is there a better approach?

The database I am using is Informix. I am using ESQL/C, which is old C with embedded SQL extension.

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You will need to do some clarification — quite a lot of it. You're using C, but are you using ODBC or ESQL/C for the database manipulation (or something else, but those are the two main possibilities). Does the input include the double quotes you show? It looks like you have a list of column names separated by commas, followed by a pipe, followed by a bunch of column values, also separated by commas — is that correct? What happens if one of the column values contains a comma? How do you know which table this is going in? Or database, come to that? You say 'insert or update' — please explain. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 22 '12 at 22:10
    
@JonathanLeffler....I am using ESQL/C. The input does not contain double quotes and yes first I have column names, then pipe, and the corresponding column values. Please ignore comma elsewhere. The table and database where I have to insert or update is fixed. –  Kundan Kumar Dec 22 '12 at 22:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The best way to deal with this is via host variables, which means you won't need quotes around values. Informix is pretty good about converting strings to other types; the only type you'll run into any trouble will be with blobs — BYTE, TEXT, BLOB, CLOB.

This code has only been compiled; it has not been executed. The various return statements are error returns except for the last. We can debate whether returning without freeing the prepared statement is correct; it is easily arguable that it isn't. There should almost certainly be several routines built out of this monster.

#include "sqlca.h"
#include "sqlda.h"
#include "sqltypes.h"
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

extern int insert_record(char *line, const char *tabname);

int insert_record(char *line, const char *tabname)
{
    /* Analyze line */
    char *pipe = strchr(line, '|');
    char *comma = line;
    int c_count = 0;
    int v_count = 0;
    while ((comma = strchr(comma, ',')) != 0 && comma < pipe)
        c_count++;
    comma = pipe;
    while ((comma = strchr(comma, ',')) != 0)
        v_count++;
    if (v_count != c_count)
        return(-1);
    char *names[c_count];
    char *value[c_count];
    char *np = line;
    char *vp = pipe+1;
    for (int i = 0; i < c_count; i++)
    {
        names[i] = np;
        value[i] = vp;
        char *sep = strchr(np, ',');
        assert(sep != 0);
        if (sep > pipe)
            sep = pipe;
        *sep = '\0';
        np = sep + 1;
        sep = strchr(vp, ',');
        if (sep != 0)
        {
            *sep = '\0';
            vp = sep + 1;
        }
    }

    /* Create SQL statement with placeholders */
    /* names[i] contains column name for entry i; value[i] contains the value */
    $ char buffer[4096];
    char *sql = buffer;
    int len = sizeof(buffer) - 1;
    int num = snprintf(sql, len, "insert into %s", tabname);
    if (num <= 0 || num >= len)
        return(-2);
    if (num <= 0 || num >= len)
        return(-2);
    sql += num;
    len -= num;
    pad = "(";
    for (int i = 0; i < c_count; i++)
    {
        num = snprintf(sql, len, "%s%s", pad, "?");
        if (num <= 0 || num >= len)
            return(-2);
        sql += num;
        len -= num;
    }
    num = snprintf(sql, len, ")");
    if (num <= 0 || num >= len)
        return(-2);

    $ PREPARE p_insert FROM :buffer;
    if (sqlca.sqlcode != 0)
        return(sqlca.sqlcode);

    /* Create sqlda to describe strings */
    ifx_sqlda_t data;
    ifx_sqlvar_t columns[c_count];
    $ struct sqlda *udesc = &data;
    data.sqld = c_count;
    data.sqlvar = columns;
    data.desc_name[0] = '\0';
    data.desc_occ = 0;
    data.reserved = 0;
    data.desc_next = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < c_count; i++)
    {
        columns[i].sqltype       = SQLVCHAR;
        columns[i].sqllen        = strlen(value[i]);
        columns[i].sqldata       = value[i];
        columns[i].sqlind        = 0;
        columns[i].sqlname       = names[i];
        columns[i].sqlformat     = 0;
        columns[i].sqlitype      = 0;
        columns[i].sqlilen       = 0;
        columns[i].sqlidata      = 0;
        columns[i].sqlxid        = 0;
        columns[i].sqltypename   = 0;
        columns[i].sqltypelen    = 0;
        columns[i].sqlownerlen   = 0;
        columns[i].sqlsourcetype = 0;
        columns[i].sqlownername  = 0;
        columns[i].sqlsourceid   = 0;
        columns[i].sqlilongdata  = 0;
        columns[i].sqlflags      = 0;
        columns[i].sqlreserved   = 0;
    }

    /* Execute the SQL and clean up */
    $ EXECUTE p_insert USING DESCRIPTOR udesc;
    if (sqlca.sqlcode != 0)
        return(sqlca.sqlcode);
    $ FREE p_insert;
    if (sqlca.sqlcode != 0)
        return(sqlca.sqlcode);
    return(0);
}
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