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In C++, it is possible to delete this and set its own reference to null.

I want to set an object instance to null itself.

public class Foo  
    {

        public void M( )
        {
           //this = null; //how to do this kind of thing
        }
    }
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closed as not a real question by DaveShaw, Stony, EdChum, François Wahl, K-ballo Dec 23 '12 at 0:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
are you sure you need that? it is not possible in c#, what are you trying to do? –  ArsenMkrt Dec 22 '12 at 22:17
1  
You cannot call f.M() if f is null. This simply doesn't make any sense. Your program will crash much before the M method is invoked. It makes strictly no sense to check inside the M method if the current instance is null because you wouldn't even be able to call this method if this is the case. –  Darin Dimitrov Dec 22 '12 at 22:21
2  
You don't have access to the variable that holds a reference to f from within M(). You just don't. Find another way to achieve your goal. Or, tell us what that goal is. –  Michael Petrotta Dec 22 '12 at 22:24
3  
You can't. End of story. Sorry. Why do you want to do this? What's your use case? We might be able to help with that. –  Michael Petrotta Dec 22 '12 at 22:25
2  
You can't. Find another way. We're not lying to you. –  Michael Petrotta Dec 22 '12 at 23:05

4 Answers 4

This is not possible in .NET. You cannot set the current instance to null from within the object itself. In .NET the current instance (this) is readonly, you cannot assign a value to it. And by the way that's not something you would even need in .NET.

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is not there any way to make current reference to null apart from this keyword –  user1924210 Dec 22 '12 at 22:29
    
No, there is no way to do this from within the object itself. Why do you want to do this from within the object? –  Darin Dimitrov Dec 22 '12 at 22:29

this is actually just a special name given to the parameter, arg0, in an instance method. Setting it to null is not allowed:

  1. you cannot ever change this for instance methods on a class
  2. you can change this for instance methods on a struct, but you can't assign null

The reason for 1. is that it would not be useful:

  • the parameter arg0 is by-val (not by-ref) on class instance methods, so the method's caller won't notice the change (for completeness: arg0 is by-ref on struct instance methods)
  • it won't really change memory management in any way:
    • setting something to null does not delete it; the GC handles that
    • if there are external roots holding a reference to the object, they will still be holding a reference to the object
    • if you are worried about the edge-case of the parameter being the last root to the object, then just exit the method

So basically, that syntax is not allowed, because it doesn't do what you want. There is no C# metaphor for what you want.

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In C++ delete this frees the memory of the object. There is no equivalent to that in C# (or any other .NET language). Although it is allowed in C++ I don't think it's a good practice. At least you have to be very careful.

.NET uses garbage collection instead to free memory. Once an object isn't referenced any more and cannot be accessed from anywhere in your code the garbage collector can eventually free the memory (and the garbage collector is careful). So just lean back and let the garbage collector do its work.

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I think you should replace "will" with "can" in the sentance Once an object isn't referenced ... the garbage collector will free the memory. The way you wrote it makes it sound like deallocation is more deterministic than it actually is. –  Conrad Frix Dec 23 '12 at 0:02

Simply no. As this is not possible to access a method from a null object. In your case you want say

F f = new F() // where f = null
f.SomeMethod(); // ?????? not possible

In this case you get a Null Reference Exception. You can see Darin's Comment and Explanation too on the same. How could you access anything from null, which means nothing. I have no idea about legacy but .Net does not provides you such things. Instead you can set it to null when its not needed anymore.

Ex From MSDN

public class Node<T>
{
        // Private member-variables
        private T data;
        private NodeList<T> neighbors = null;

        public Node() {}
        public Node(T data) : this(data, null) {}
        public Node(T data, NodeList<T> neighbors)
        {
            this.data = data;
            this.neighbors = neighbors;
        }

        public T Value
        {
            get
            {
                return data;
            }
            set
            {
                data = value;
            }
        }

        protected NodeList<T> Neighbors
        {
            get
            {
                return neighbors;
            }
            set
            {
                neighbors = value;
            }
        }
    }
}


public class NodeList<T> : Collection<Node<T>>
{
    public NodeList() : base() { }

    public NodeList(int initialSize)
    {
        // Add the specified number of items
        for (int i = 0; i < initialSize; i++)
            base.Items.Add(default(Node<T>));
    }

    public Node<T> FindByValue(T value)
    {
        // search the list for the value
        foreach (Node<T> node in Items)
            if (node.Value.Equals(value))
                return node;

        // if we reached here, we didn't find a matching node
        return null;
    }
}

 and Right—that operate on the base class's Neighbors property.
public class BinaryTreeNode<T> : Node<T>
{
    public BinaryTreeNode() : base() {}
    public BinaryTreeNode(T data) : base(data, null) {}
    public BinaryTreeNode(T data, BinaryTreeNode<T> left, BinaryTreeNode<T> right)
    {
        base.Value = data;
        NodeList<T> children = new NodeList<T>(2);
        children[0] = left;
        children[1] = right;

        base.Neighbors = children;
    }

    public BinaryTreeNode<T> Left
    {
        get
        {
            if (base.Neighbors == null)
                return null;
            else
                return (BinaryTreeNode<T>) base.Neighbors[0];
        }
        set
        {
            if (base.Neighbors == null)
                base.Neighbors = new NodeList<T>(2);

            base.Neighbors[0] = value;
        }
    }

    public BinaryTreeNode<T> Right
    {
        get
        {
            if (base.Neighbors == null)
                return null;
            else
                return (BinaryTreeNode<T>) base.Neighbors[1];
        }
        set
        {
            if (base.Neighbors == null)
                base.Neighbors = new NodeList<T>(2);

            base.Neighbors[1] = value;
        }
    }
}


public class BinaryTree<T>
{
   private BinaryTreeNode<T> root;

   public BinaryTree()
   {
      root = null;
   }

   public virtual void Clear()
   {
      root = null;
   }

   public BinaryTreeNode<T> Root
   {
      get
      {
         return root;
      }
      set
      {
         root = value;
      }
   }
}
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Firstly this was working as c++ code. I did not need any wrapper. I operated on node class. I ported it to c# but I could not find any "delete this" equivalent to implement. I read msdn BST article before. –  user1924210 Dec 22 '12 at 22:59

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