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I created a class with a method drawSphere to replace glutDrawSolidSphere. See code below.

But I wonder, how do I wrap a texture around it without tiling? For example, if I want to draw a mouth, eyes and a nose on it, then I want it to have only one mouth, two eyes and one nose, and not 100 tiled all over the sphere.

I'm using Jogl with some libraries.

class Shape {

    public void drawSphere(double radius, int slices, int stacks) {
        gl.glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
        head.bind(gl); //This method is a shorthand equivalent of gl.glBindTexture(texture.getTarget(), texture.getTextureObject());
        gl.glBegin(GL_QUADS);
        double stack = (2*PI)/stacks;
        double slice = (2*PI)/slices;
        for (double theta = 0; theta < 2 * PI; theta += stack) {
            for (double phi = 0; phi < 2 * PI; phi += slice) {
                Vector p1 = getPoints(phi, theta, radius);
                Vector p2 = getPoints(phi + slice, theta, radius);
                Vector p3 = getPoints(phi + slice, theta + stack, radius);
                Vector p4 = getPoints(phi, theta + stack, radius);
                gl.glTexCoord2d(0, 0);
                gl.glVertex3d(p1.x(), p1.y(), p1.z());
                gl.glTexCoord2d(1, 0);
                gl.glVertex3d(p2.x(), p2.y(), p2.z());
                gl.glTexCoord2d(1, 1);
                gl.glVertex3d(p3.x(), p3.y(), p3.z());
                gl.glTexCoord2d(0, 1);
                gl.glVertex3d(p4.x(), p4.y(), p4.z());
            }
        }
        gl.glEnd();
        gl.glDisable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
    }

    Vector getPoints(double phi, double theta, double radius) {
        double x = radius * cos(theta) * sin(phi);
        double y = radius * sin(theta) * sin(phi);
        double z = radius * cos(phi);
        return new Vector(x, y, z);
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could just map latitude and longitude directly to the texture co-ordinates.

for (double theta = 0; theta < 2 * PI; theta += stack) {
    for (double phi = 0; phi < 2 * PI; phi += slice) {

Just scale theta and phi to be between 0 and 1.

double s0 = theta / (2 * PI);
double s1 = (theta + stack) / (2 * PI);
double t0 = phi / (2 * PI);
double t1 = (phi + slice) / (2 * PI);

And use s0,s1,t0,t1 in place of 0 and 1 in your texCoord() calls.

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Thanks! That was really helpful :) –  Yatoom Dec 23 '12 at 1:08
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