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In index.html under body tag:

<a href="javascript:setTempInc()">+</a> <a href="javascript:setMode(0)">-</a>

and under <head><script type="text/javascript">:

var url = "get.php";

function ajaxRequest()
{
    var xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function()
    {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState == 4 && xmlhttp.status == 200)
        {
            var jsondata = eval("(" + xmlhttp.responseText + ")"); //retrieve result as an JavaScript object

            document.getElementById("y").innerHTML = jsondata.y;

        }
    }

    xmlhttp.open("GET", url, true);
    xmlhttp.send();
}

function setTempInc()
{
    var oldUrl = url;
    url = url + "9001" + jsondata.y;
    ajaxRequest();
    url = oldUrl;
}

I don't understand where the problem is. url is a string and jsondata.y is a int but the script doesn't work!

This function does, though:

function setMode(val)
{
    var oldUrl = url;
    url = url + "91" + val + "000";
    ajaxRequest();
    url = oldUrl;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Improve your question title, so, more people can help you! –  Gabriel Santos Dec 23 '12 at 1:56
    
Please provide the errors you are getting. –  Michael Durrant Dec 23 '12 at 1:56
    
Did you checked your javascript console for errors? –  Jordi Kroon Dec 23 '12 at 1:57
    
Which browser are you using? –  Michael Durrant Dec 23 '12 at 1:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would think that

var jsondata = eval("(" + xmlhttp.responseText + ")"); 

is not available to be called at

url = url + "9001" + jsondata.y;

as it is only defined inside the ajaxRequest function's scope.

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, the scope is even smaller: the onreadystatechange handler. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Dec 23 '12 at 2:02

Set variables outside functions, to use as a global variable!

This probably will work:

(function() {
    var url = "get.php";
    var oldUrl = '';
    var jsondata = '';

    function ajaxRequest()
    {
        var xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest();

        xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = function()
        {
            if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
            {
                jsondata = eval("("+xmlhttp.responseText+")"); //retrieve result as an JavaScript object

                document.getElementById("y").innerHTML = jsondata.y;

            }
        }

        xmlhttp.open("GET",url,true);
        xmlhttp.send();
    }

    function setTempInc()
    {
        oldUrl = url;
        url = url + "9001" + jsondata.y;
        ajaxRequest();
        url = oldUrl;
    }
})();

Added Closure to avoid common security problems

share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoter, comments? –  Gabriel Santos Dec 23 '12 at 2:12
    
I didn't provide the downvote but I assume it's because a) you're not adding anything by doing that and b) global variables should be avoided like the plague. –  Marty Dec 23 '12 at 2:16
    
@MartyWallace This solve the problem, and, I can't do nothing without global variables, in this case. –  Gabriel Santos Dec 23 '12 at 2:22
    
@MartyWallace Added closure, so, global variable will be "more safe". –  Gabriel Santos Dec 23 '12 at 2:25
    
It's not really security that's an issue, more just code maintainability issues arise if everything is global (conflicts etc). –  Marty Dec 23 '12 at 2:26

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