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Millions of developers write shell scripts to solve various types of tasks. I use shell scripts to simplify deployment, life-cycle management, installation or simply as a glue language.

What I've noticed is nobody actually cares about shell scripts style and quality. A lot of teams spend many hours fixing Java, C++, ... style issues, but totally ignore issues in their shell scripts. By the way, usually there is no standard way to implement a shell script within a particular project, so the one may find dozens different, ugly and buggy scripts, spread around the codebase.

To overcome that issue in my projects I decided to create a shell script template, universal and good enough. I will provide my templates as is to make this question a bit more useful. Out of the box these templates provides:

  • command-line arguments handling
  • synchronization
  • some basic help

Arguments handling: getopts (latest version: shell-script-template@github)

#!/bin/bash
# ------------------------------------------------------------------
# [Author] Title
#          Description
# ------------------------------------------------------------------

VERSION=0.1.0
SUBJECT=some-unique-id
USAGE="Usage: command -ihv args"

# --- Options processing -------------------------------------------
if [ $# == 0 ] ; then
    echo $USAGE
    exit 1;
fi

while getopts ":i:vh" optname
  do
    case "$optname" in
      "v")
        echo "Version $VERSION"
        exit 0;
        ;;
      "i")
        echo "-i argument: $OPTARG"
        ;;
      "h")
        echo $USAGE
        exit 0;
        ;;
      "?")
        echo "Unknown option $OPTARG"
        exit 0;
        ;;
      ":")
        echo "No argument value for option $OPTARG"
        exit 0;
        ;;
      *)
        echo "Unknown error while processing options"
        exit 0;
        ;;
    esac
  done

shift $(($OPTIND - 1))

param1=$1
param2=$2

# --- Locks -------------------------------------------------------
LOCK_FILE=/tmp/$SUBJECT.lock
if [ -f "$LOCK_FILE" ]; then
   echo "Script is already running"
   exit
fi

trap "rm -f $LOCK_FILE" EXIT
touch $LOCK_FILE

# --- Body --------------------------------------------------------
#  SCRIPT LOGIC GOES HERE
echo $param1
echo $param2
# -----------------------------------------------------------------

Shell Flags (shFlags) allows to simplify command-line arguments handling a lot, so at some moment of time I decided not to ignore such possibility.

Arguments handling: shflags (latest version: shell-script-template@github)

#!/bin/bash
# ------------------------------------------------------------------
# [Author] Title
#          Description
#
#          This script uses shFlags -- Advanced command-line flag
#          library for Unix shell scripts.
#          http://code.google.com/p/shflags/
#
# Dependency:
#     http://shflags.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/source/1.0/src/shflags
# ------------------------------------------------------------------
VERSION=0.1.0
SUBJECT=some-unique-id
USAGE="Usage: command -hv args"

# --- Option processing --------------------------------------------
if [ $# == 0 ] ; then
    echo $USAGE
    exit 1;
fi

. ./shflags

DEFINE_string 'aparam' 'adefault' 'First parameter'
DEFINE_string 'bparam' 'bdefault' 'Second parameter'

# parse command line
FLAGS "$@" || exit 1
eval set -- "${FLAGS_ARGV}"

shift $(($OPTIND - 1))

param1=$1
param2=$2

# --- Locks -------------------------------------------------------
LOCK_FILE=/tmp/${SUBJECT}.lock

if [ -f "$LOCK_FILE" ]; then
echo "Script is already running"
exit
fi

trap "rm -f $LOCK_FILE" EXIT
touch $LOCK_FILE

# -- Body ---------------------------------------------------------
#  SCRIPT LOGIC GOES HERE
echo "Param A: $FLAGS_aparam"
echo "Param B: $FLAGS_bparam"
echo $param1
echo $param2
# -----------------------------------------------------------------

I do think these templates can be improved to simplify developer's life even more.

So the question is how to improve them to have the following:

  • built-in logging
  • better error handling
  • better portability
  • smaller footprint
  • built-in execution time tracking
share|improve this question
3  
You're seeking to provide a template that covers all eventualities; the trouble, any given script does not need to cover all eventualities. You're right that many shell scripts are abominably tatty (I cringe when I see if (test -f "$file") in Bourne/Korn/Bash scripts in the code base I work on — and sometimes get to fix it despite not having permission to do so). However, speaking from experience, enough boilerplate in the template becomes unproductive. I've had 100-line templates before; I now have 10 line templates. They're more useful in the long run — to me. It's good to give examples. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 23 '12 at 2:24
    
Yes, I agree. It is better to say I'm interested in a meta-template, to be used as a skeleton within a particular project. Basically, the idea is to make all project scripts homogeneous, so some building blocks are needed. These blocks can be optional, so for a concrete project 20-line template will be provided. –  Renat Gilmanov Dec 23 '12 at 3:26
2  
Don't say "nobody"! I care a great deal about the quality of shell scripts, and am regularly horrified by existing code. –  William Pursell Dec 23 '12 at 12:46
    
Yes, sorry, I should not be that explicit. I meant nobody near me, which does not seem to be a good approach too. Will try to be more careful next time. Thank you. –  Renat Gilmanov Dec 23 '12 at 20:27
    
Error messages should be written to stderr instead of stdout. For example, echo 'error message here' >&2. That way the user can easily redirect errors to a file or /dev/null if they so choose. –  toxalot Mar 12 at 8:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would steer clear of relying on bash as the shell and model your solution on top of shell syntax defined by POSIX and use /bin/sh on the shebang. We had a number of surprises recently when Ubuntu changed /bin/sh to dash.

Another pandemic in the shell world is a general misunderstanding of exit status codes. Exiting with an understandable code is what lets other shell scripts programmatically react to specific failures. Unfortunately, there is not a lot of guidance on this beyond the "sysexits.h" header file.

If you are looking for more information about good shell scripting practices, concentrate on Korn shell scripting resources. Ksh programming tends to focus on really programming as opposed to writing haphazard scripts.

Personally, I haven't found much use for shell templates. The unfortunate truth is that most engineers will simply copy and paste your template and continue to write the same sloppy shell code. A better approach is to create a library of shell functions with well-defined semantics and then convince others to use them. This approach will also help with change control. For example, if you find a defect in a template, then every script that was based on it is broken and would require modifications. Using a library makes it possible to fix defects in one place.

Welcome to the world of shell scripting. Writing shell scripts is a bit of a lost art that seems to be entering a renaissance. There were some good books written on the subject in the late 90's - UNIX Shell Programming by Burns and Arthur comes to mind though the Amazon reviews for the book make it seem awful. IMHO, effective shell code embraces the UNIX philosophy as described by Eric S. Raymond in The Art of Unix Programming.

share|improve this answer

If you're concerned about portability, do not use == in tests. Use = instead. Do not explicitly check if $# is 0. Instead, use ${n?error message} the first time you reference a required argument (eg ${3?error message}). This prevents the extremely annoying practice of emitting a usage statement instead of an error message. And most importantly, always put error messages on the right stream and exit with the correct status. For example:

echo "Unknown error while processing options" >&2
exit 1;

It is often convenient to do something like:

die() { echo "$*"; exit 1; } >&2
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not a big fan of ${var?msg}. It's almost as bad as set -u. It throws a real bash error that's indistinguishable from internal errors to those not familiar with error messages. It can occur in a non-obvious location in the middle of a command in a function that might be inadvertently called from a subshell. Or if you have branching with usage of the parameter in multiple branches, you have to duplicate the check. Harmful side-effects can occur from bailing out half-way through evaluating expansions. An explicit check is much better, e.g. ${3+:} die msg or ! ${3+false} || die msg. –  ormaaj Dec 24 '12 at 4:35

I will also share my results. The idea behind all these examples is to encourage overall quality. It is also important to make sure final result is safe enough.

Logging

It is really crucial to have proper logging available from the same beginning. I'm just trying to think about production usage.

TAG="foo"
LOG_FILE="example.log"

function log() {
    if [ $HIDE_LOG ]; then
        echo -e "[$TAG] $@" >> $LOG_FILE
    else
        echo "[`date +"%Y/%m/%d:%H:%M:%S %z"`] [$TAG] $@" | tee -a $LOG_FILE
    fi
}

log "[I] service start"
log "[D] debug message"

Command test

This is about safety, real-life environments and proper error-handling. Could be optional.

function is_command () {
    log "[I] check if commad $1 exists"
    type "$1" &> /dev/null ;
}

CMD=zip

if is_command ${CMD} ; then
   log "[I] '${CMD}' command found"
else
   log "[E] '${CMD}' command not found"
fi

Template processing

Could be only my subjective opinion, but anyway. I used several different ways to generate some configuration/etc right from the script. Perl, sed and others do the job, but look a little bit scary.

Recently I noticed a better way:

function process_template() {
    source $1 > $2

    result=$?
    if [ $result -ne 0 ]; then
        log "[E] Error during template processing: '$1' > '$2'"
    fi
    return $result
}

VALUE1="tmpl-value-1"
VALUE2="tmpl-value-2"
VALUE3="tmpl-value-3"

process_template template.tmpl template.result

Template example

echo "Line1: ${VALUE1}
Line2: ${VALUE2}
Line3: ${VALUE3}"

Result example

Line1: tmpl-value-1
Line2: tmpl-value-2
Line3: tmpl-value-3
share|improve this answer

There is no more helpful thing to a shell script than a well documented behaviour with examples of usage and a list of known bugs. I think that no one program can be titled bulletproof, and bugs may appear in every moment (especially when your script gets used by the other people), so the only thing I’m taking care of is the good coding style and using only these things that the script really need. You’re standing on the way of aggregating, and it always going to become a large system which comes with a lot of unused modules, which is hard to port and hard to support. And the more system trying to be portable, the bigger it grows. Seriously, shell scripts do not need it to be implemented in that way. They must be kept as small as possible to simplify further use.

If the system really needs something big and bulletproof, it’s time to think about C99 or even C++.

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