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I tried this for many hours.. I have a thread that changes a JTextField of my UI, which completely destroys the UI. The Thread (lets call it Thread A) is generated by an ActionListener. The .setText() function call is in a extra thread (B) created by Thread A. Thread B is the Parameter of SwingUtilitis.invokeAll() and/or SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(). I tried them both. Here's some code to make it more clear.

This is my ActionListener which creates Thread A - shortened of course:

public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
    Object source = evt.getSource();
    if (source == window.getBtn_Search()) {
        Refresher refresh = new Refresher();
        refresh.start();
    }
}

This is my Thread A, which later puts Thread B into the EDT Queue:

public class Refresher extends Thread implements Runnable {

private int counter = 0;
private UI window = null;
private int defRefresh = 0;

@Override
public void run() {
    while(true){
        -bazillion lines of code-
                do {
                    try {
                        Refresher.sleep(1000);
                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                    if(window.canceled()) break;
                    UI.updateCounter(window.getLbl_Status(), (Configuration.getRefreshTime()-counter));
                    counter++;
                } while (counter <= Configuration.getRefreshTime());
             - more code-
    }
}
}

The UI.updateCounter(...) will queue Thread B into the EDT.

public static void updateCounter(final JLabel label, final int i) {
    try {
        SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait( 
            new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    label.setText("Refreshing in: " + i + " seconds.");
                }
            }
        );
    } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

Now when the last function gets called, everything gets messed up. I tried different stuff for hours and nothing worked. I also tried using SwingWorker, but the some or nothing at all happened.

share|improve this question
    
And...what gets "messed up"? –  MadProgrammer Dec 23 '12 at 3:02
    
I have a JPanel which contains multiple smaller JPanels, these contain an icon and multiple JLabels. When the function gets called these JLabels appear in different places, some disappear completely. The Label window.getLbl_Status() has nothing to do with these and are somewhere completely else. The Icon also changes positions –  user1924422 Dec 23 '12 at 3:05
2  
The change to the value of your label may be effecting the layout of it's container and the containers around it –  MadProgrammer Dec 23 '12 at 3:07
1  
You need to provide the label with enough room that when its text changes, it doesn't want to bully the rest of components. A cheeky way is to use a none editable text field. Remove its board and make transparent. –  MadProgrammer Dec 23 '12 at 3:15
2  
I wonder if you wouldn't be better served by using a JTable and then updating its model rather than a bunch of JLabels. Consider telling and showing us more about your problem. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 23 '12 at 3:18

3 Answers 3

In general, labels are not very good at displaying text which change: their width change, and the layout with it.

Using a read-only JTextField, perhaps with proper changes in style, could be a better solution.

share|improve this answer

I think the intermediate JPanels you've created may count as validation roots. Therefore the revalidate() that automagically happens when you call setText() does not cause any layout changes higher than the level of the JPanel parent.

I don't think you actually need the panels, since a JLabel can contain both an Icon and text. See the tutorial.

So my advice is to remove the panels or, if they serve a purpose, make sure isValidateRoot() on the panels returns false.

share|improve this answer

When changing the label's text you should at least call repaint()/revalidate() on the label's topmost container, triggering a relayout, assuming the label calls invalidate()/revalidate() correctly on text change.

share|improve this answer
    
No, the setText() will trigger a revalidate() and a repaint(). There is no need to do so yourself. See grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/… –  flup May 22 at 7:16
    
Read again, what I wrote: "assuming the label calls invalidate()/revalidate() correctly on text change", I never said this should be done by yourself –  stryba May 22 at 9:47
    
Revalidating the topmost container makes no sense since the label and its parent panel have already been through a revalidate and will claim to be valid. And what will repainting everything achieve if the label text has already been repainted, albeit on a panel with the wrong size? It'll simply repaint everything exactly as it was. You could advise to call invalidate on the label and its grandparent and then validate on its grandparent. Though even then I'd call it a workaround. –  flup May 22 at 10:15
    
Just thought about it, and you are right. Don't know what I thought at that time. –  stryba May 22 at 11:13

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