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G'Day,

I have a question more towards helping me understand on more about how Excel VBA can effectively manage defined ranges that have been declared in one place in order to execute data well. Just wanting to work out which two options (I know so far) is better or not as preferred best practice before working more on this project.

The problem I'm solving is to make a small table containing a number of failures across a set of fictional suppliers, thus the table looks like this (sorry it is in raw form)

"Company Name" "No. of Failures"
"Be Cool Machine" 7
"Coolant Quarters" 5
"Little Water Coolants 3
"Air Movers Systems" 7
"Generals Coolant" 5
"Admire Coolants" 4

My first option (Const String) is this module/formula as follows.

Option Explicit
Public Const CountofFailures As String = "J7:J12"
Sub btnRandom()
    ' Declaration of variables
    Dim c As Range

    ' Provide a random number for failures across Suppliers
    For Each c In ActiveSheet.Range(CountofFailures)
        c.Value = Random1to10
    Next c
End Sub

Function Random1to10() As Integer
    'Ensure we have a different value each time we run this macro
    Randomize
    ' Provide a random number from 1 to 10 (Maximum number of Failures)
    Random1to10 = Int(Rnd() * 10 + 1)
End Function

Second option (Defined Name) is this module/formula as follows.

Option Explicit
Sub btnRandom()
    ' Declaration of variables
    Dim c As Range
    Dim iLoop As Long

    ' Provide a random number for Suppliers with Defined Range
    For Each c In ActiveWorkbook.Names("CountofFailures").RefersToRange
        c.Value = Random1to10
    Next c
End Sub

Function Random1to10() As Integer
    'Ensure we have a different value each time we run this macro
    Randomize
    ' Provide a random number from 1 to 10 (Maximum number of Failures)
    Random1to10 = Int(Rnd() * 10 + 1)
End Function

Any suggestions - I would do a macro timer test later if this helps?

Would there be a third option if I fetch a range listed in a cell as value? I haven't seen a code that does this in practice?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Both of your codes loop through ranges which will be the bottleneck. I suggest you

  1. Use a range name to automatically "locate" your data - ie if you insert/delete rows and columns your reference remains intact. My experience though is that many range names in a file can end up obfuscating what the workbook is doing
  2. Do a single write to this range

code

Sub QuickFill()
Randomize
Range("CountofFailures").Formula = "=Randbetween(1,10)"
Range("CountofFailures").Value = Range("CountofFailures").Value
End Sub
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Brett, would I be right in saying that the last .value = .value line is the same as a copy, paste special equal values? –  user1924393 Dec 23 '12 at 13:48
    
Yes - it converts the formulae to values –  brettdj Dec 23 '12 at 21:33
1  
thought so, thanks for the advice Brett. I'll arrange the subroutines to follow this general pattern. –  user1924393 Dec 29 '12 at 6:51

I don't know the performance difference-I suspect const is faster. My general advice is 'don't worry about performance until you have a performance problem'. Otherwise you end up guessing what to spend your optimize time on and it may not be right.

As for named ranges, the benefit is that they move when you insert rows and columns. If you insert a new column at column I your first example needs to be edited and your second example will conitinue to work.

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alright. I'll stop the performance hat thinking til I know I have a performance problem. –  user1924393 Dec 23 '12 at 13:45

I have found that Named Ranges are slower (presumably because Excel has to do an internal lookup on the Name to find what it refers to), but you are very unlikely to be able to find a significant dofference except in very extreme cases (tens of thousands of names being referenced tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands times).
And as Dick says: the benefits far outweigh the insignificant speed loss.

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