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I noticed that DrawableGameComponent could be used for "instance class"

DrawableGameComponent contain some "overrides" such as Draw, LoadContent, Update etc... take a look at this code below:

this is the class of Game1:

 public class Game1 : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Game
    {

        public Game1()
        {
        graphics = new GraphicsDeviceManager(this);
        Content.RootDirectory = "Contenttt";
        graphics.PreferredBackBufferWidth = GAME_WIDTH;
        graphics.PreferredBackBufferHeight = GAME_HEIGHT;
        }
     }

the code of my other class:

public class Bullet: DrawableGameComponent //based by DrawableGameComponent
{
    public Bullet(Game1 game): base(game) //set argument for draablegamecomponent

    {
        //do something
    }
}

DrawableGameComponent:

public DrawableGameComponent (Game game )

parameter description:

game Type: Game The Game that the game component should be attached to.**

As you can see, the parameter of DrawableGameComponent is a class of Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Game. then we fill it with our Game1 class.

this is the code of my other class and will impact in my World Game1 the override by DrawableGameComponent

 protected override void Initialize()
        {
            base.Initialize();            
        }
        protected override void LoadContent()
        {             

        }

        protected override void UnloadContent()
        {
        }

The question are: why do we can use their "overrides" on my own class? why is this would impact the game1 world?

Whereas, in c# a "base" statement just like

public class Bullet: MyClass

we can't make it based "instance" class.

But for DrawableGameComponent, the instance class, they can set it up through their parameter so their "override void" will work on class of parameter that we put before.

If you know how the way, please let me know how to make the class.

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3  
I have absolutely no idea what it is that you are trying to ask here. –  PhoenixReborn Dec 23 '12 at 3:50
    
my point is: how can we create a class just like DrawableGameComponent? –  Rizky Dec 23 '12 at 4:01
1  
The answer is either 1. You don't, it's already written for you... or 2. public class MyClass {}. What exactly are you trying to do? –  PhoenixReborn Dec 23 '12 at 4:07
    
public class Bullet: MyClass. doesn't use an "instance class". but public class Bullet: DrawableGameComponent this certainly to use "instance class" through the parameters –  Rizky Dec 23 '12 at 4:13
    
I think the OP is trying to ask why it is not possible to create an instance of DrawableGameComponent. (Is it really not possible? Also why would the OP need it?) –  user1306322 Dec 23 '12 at 4:20
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It sounds like you might not understand the idea of a virtual method. The ability to override methods is available because methods defined in the base class are marked as virtual. Basically these are examples of the Template Method design pattern. virtual or abstract methods allow their implemntation to change in subclasses (or in the case of an abstract class, be completely deffered).

public abstract class BaseClass
{
   public void TemplateMethod()
   {
      DoSomething();
      DoSomethingElse();
   }

   protected virtual void DoSomething()
   {
      // implementation that can be changed or extended
   }

   // no implementation; an implementation must be provided in the inheritor
   protected abstract void DoSomethingElse();
}

public sealed class SubClass : BaseClass
{
   protected override DoSomething()
   {
      // add extra implementation before
      base.DoSomething(); // optionally use base class' implementation
      // add extra implementation after
   }

   protected override DoSomethingElse()
   {
      // write an implementation, since one did not exist in the base
   }
}

Then you can do the following:

SubClass subClass = new SubClass();

// will call the new implementations of DoSomething and DoSomethingElse
subClass.TemplateMethod();

See Also:

share|improve this answer
    
wooow Exactly what I mean. thank you anyway! –  Rizky Dec 23 '12 at 23:37
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