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I'm having a little trouble with linked lists. I don't understand why this code will traverse and print the linked list with no issue:

struct foo {
    int data;
    struct foo * next;
};

int main(void) {
    struct foo * bar = NULL;
    ...
    print(bar);
}

void print(struct foo * bar) {
    while (bar != NULL) {
        printf("%d, bar->data);
        bar = bar->next;
    }
}

Yet when I place the list inside another structure, like an array, the list gets destroyed during traversal because pointers get reassigned at bar[i] = bar[i]->next:

struct foo {
    int data;
    struct foo * next;
};

int main(void) {
    struct foo ** bar = (struct foo**)malloc(SIZE * sizeof(struct foo*));
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        bar[i] = NULL;
    ...
    print(bar);
}

void print(struct foo ** bar) {
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        while (bar[i] != NULL) {
            printf("%d, bar->data);
            bar[i] = bar[i]->next;
        }
}

Why does this happen? I know a proper way to write the print function in this scenario would be:

void print(struct foo ** bar) {
    struct foo * helper;
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        for (helper = foo[i]; helper != NULL; helper = helper->next)
            printf("%d", helper[i]->data);
}

I just want to understand why. Why do pointers not get reassigned in the first scenario, but do on the second? I assume it's something to do with passing values vs passing references, but that would mean the first function destroys the list too. Can anyone offer some insight?

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1  
bar is being passed by address (i.e. its hot). you're modifying the underlying pointer stored within your pointer array during the traversal. Invoke your original walk function with bar[i] as the param input and it should work as you expect. –  WhozCraig Dec 23 '12 at 3:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
void print(struct foo* bar)
{
    while (bar != NULL)
    {
        printf("%d, bar->data);
        bar = bar->next;
    }
}

This function takes a copy of a pointer to struct foo as a first argument. No matter what the function does with it, I am sure that the original pointer will not be modified, since I'm just working with a copy here. The value that the pointer points to on the other hand, may be modified.

void print(struct foo** bar)
{
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; i++)
        while (bar[i] != NULL)
        {
            printf("%d, bar->data);
                bar[i] = bar[i]->next;
        }
}

This function takes a copy of a pointer to pointer to struct foo as a first argument. Once again, the original pointer to pointer cannot be modified from here, the value which it points too on the other hand, which is a pointer to foo here, may be modified. Of course, the value pointed by the pointer pointed by bar, can also be modified.

If you've understood this correctly, you should realize why passing struct something instead of struct something* to a function, is a bad idea performance-wise.

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