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I am trying to retrieve data from json webservice.

if (xmlHttp.status == 200 || xmlHttp.status == 0)
        {
            var result = xmlHttp.responseText;
            json = eval("(" + result + ")");
        }

i"m getting nothing for the var result. When i replace the webservice with a text file which contains json object, then i can retrieve the json object as responseText. Please help

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1  
Did you check what's the value of xmlHttp.status? –  Stanley Dec 23 '12 at 4:08
    
That code doesn't work, please post a working example. –  Ja͢ck Dec 23 '12 at 4:21
    
value of xmlHttp.status is 0 –  ishk Dec 23 '12 at 4:22
    
Is the service on the same server as the service you're trying to call? If not, you may be running afoul the Same Origin Policy. If that's the case, you need to either proxy the service on your own site, or see if the service offers a JSONP version. –  Scott Sauyet Dec 23 '12 at 4:43
    
currently im running this service in localhost,its in the same server, i can see the json data when i run this service in the browser. –  ishk Dec 23 '12 at 4:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First things first... never ever, ever, ever use eval*. eval = evil.

How to use GET with AJAX...

try {
    http = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
} catch (e1) {
    try {
        http = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    } catch (e2) {
        this.xmlhttp = null;
    }
}
var url = "/uri/of/web-service?val1=Laura&val2=Linney" + Math.random();
var params = "val1=Laura&val2=Linney";
http.open("GET", url, true);

http.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if(http.readyState == 4 && http.status == 200) {
        // we have a response and this is where we do something with it
        json = JSON.parse(http.responseText);
    }
}
http.send();

How to use POST with AJAX...

try {
    http = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
} catch (e1) {
    try {
        http = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    } catch (e2) {
        this.xmlhttp = null;
    }
}
var url = "/uri/of/web-service";
var params = "val1=Laura&val2=Linney";
http.open("POST", url, true);

http.setRequestHeader("Content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
http.setRequestHeader("Content-length", params.length);
http.setRequestHeader("Connection", "close");

http.onreadystatechange = function() {
    if(http.readyState == 4 && http.status == 200) {
        // we have a response and this is where we do something with it
        json = JSON.parse(http.responseText);
    }
}
http.send(params);
share|improve this answer
    
im trying to open the connection with GET, so may i know how this code change if it is a GET request? –  ishk Dec 23 '12 at 4:37
    
Okay, shit, I must admit I've been using eval() over JSON.parse. You clearly say this is bad, so I only assume you know exactly why.. Would you mind educating me about this function and its risks? I'm assuming it'd be because eval() will execute any javascript functionality, whereas parse, will simply attempt to parse it into an object –  Atticus Dec 23 '12 at 4:42
    
@Atticus: If you own the service, eval is not quite so evil. But JSON.parse is almost always better. But note that it's not available on certain older browser, such as IE<8. So you will either have to shim it or have a fallback and a check before using it. –  Scott Sauyet Dec 23 '12 at 4:46
    
i tried this code but im getting "SyntaxError: JSON.parse: unexpected end of data" near the json=JSON.parse(http.responseText). may i know the reason? –  ishk Dec 23 '12 at 4:47
    
@Atticus eval is evil where user-entered data, or data coming from elsewhere is concerned. It allows an attacker to run arbitrary code in your application. –  Gordon Freeman Dec 23 '12 at 4:49

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