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Code:

void w(char* c, int i)
{
    char * t;
    sprintf(t, "%d", i);
    perror(c);
    perror(t);
}

int main(void)
{
    w("qwe", 5);
    return 0;
}

causes segmentation fault, but

int main(void)
{
    perror("qwdasda");
    w("qwe", 5);
}

works. Why? My question does not meet your quality standards.

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closed as off-topic by Leushenko, Shankar Damodaran, Tom Fenech, meskobalazs, EdChum Mar 4 at 9:08

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Leushenko, Shankar Damodaran, Tom Fenech, meskobalazs, EdChum
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is your segmentation fault:

char *t;
sprintf(t,"%d",i);

In this code, t is input to sprintf(). However, t is uninitialized so sprintf() will scribble on your memory. It is almost never advisable to use sprintf(), use snprintf() instead:

char buf[32];
snprintf(buf, sizeof(buf), "%d", i);
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The sprintf() call is stomping on some random memory since t was not initialised to point at any storage in particular. That's probably what's crashing.

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