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I have a code:

    if (Ly0 > 32767) {
        buffer[index] = 32767;
    } else if (Ly0 < -32768) {
        buffer[index] = -32768;
    } else {
        buffer[index] = (short) Ly0;
   }
  • buffer is short type.
  • Ly0 is float type.

I need to cast float to short, if integer part of float more than short max value short should be equals short max value, and if integer part of float less than short min value short should be equals short min value, in other cases i need to convert float to short and get only integer value of float.

In other words i need to cast from float to short and truncate float if it out of range of short.

The problem is that this approach is not enouth fast, and durty.

Is any faster and cleanest way to convert float to short.

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I think you missed a minus sign in the 2nd branch. –  KennyTM Dec 23 '12 at 9:21
    
You will never get fast enough by only changing that part of the code. You need to show the whole loop, because that's what is slow, not the above code. –  Sam Hocevar Dec 23 '12 at 9:57
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With sse intrinsics you can first convert to integers and then perform a long int to short int saturating conversion (with PACKSSDW).

A "portable" way is to use e.g. ORC, which is a library for runtime compilation for optimized innerloops that uses mmx, sse, neon and avs; as well as providing compatible serial implementations.

Even before that one may want to check the compiler output. Eg. with gcc -ffast-math -O3 etc. the compiler can often generate already xmm instructions and parallelize large loops, whose iteration count is known at compile time. With "luck == brute force" one can probably tweak the c-code into a form where the compiler can recognize the saturating pack pattern. Often it just depends on micromanaging the types of intermediate calculations. (is the comparison signed or unsigned, is it int or short etc.)

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If you have a reasonably bright compiler, and you are actually doing this in a loop - and assuming you give the compiler a good hint of "optimize this", then it should be able to figure out what you are doing and use "clever" instructions, such as SSE/SSE2 - assuming the processor you are compiling for supports it, of course.

Otherwise, using compiler specific extensions or inline assembler will be your choice - both gcc and MS compilers have intrinsic functions to do this sort of thing - or, as suggested, there may be external libraries that do this well. Again, assuming there is processor support for this sort of operation.

A final suggestion, it MAY be that it's faster to do something like this (on some processors):

int x = Ly0;
if (x > 32767) x = 32767;
else if (x < -32768) x = -32768;
buffer[index] = (short)x; 

The reason being that floating point comparisons are sometimes more expensive than integer ones - and the compiler may do a better job of optimising this code. But that's not guaranteed - as always, benchmark and compare. It never hurts to look at the compiler output and see if you think it makes sense too!

Edit: The above code assumes that the values aren't VERY far away from your expected range. For values outside 4 billion, it will go wrong. If that happens, then you will need to use floating point comparisons, no matter what.

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Probably there is no way to optimize this peace of code. I guess this code is performing inside some cycle many times as you have performance issues. You need to think about optimizing the cycle. For example if Ly0 values are in random access container following optimization may yield good results.

for (int index = 0; index < (Ly0s.size() - 4); idx += 4) {
    do_conversion_for(index);
    do_conversion_for(index + 1);
    do_conversion_for(index + 2);
    do_conversion_for(index + 3);
}
switch (Ly0s.size() % 4){
    case 3:
        do_conversion_for(index + 3);
    case 2:
        do_conversion_for(index + 2);
    case 1:
        do_conversion_for(index + 1);
}

instead of

for (int index = 0; index < Ly0s.size(); ++idx) {
    do_conversion_for(index);
}
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