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I need to draw a fractal swirl using the algorithm Iterated Function System.

Targeted Fractal Image

There are coefficients for this fractal:

0.745455 -0.459091  0.406061  0.887121 1.460279 0.691072 0.912675
-0.424242 -0.065152 -0.175758 -0.218182 3.809567 6.741476 0.087325

And here is my code:

import java.awt.Graphics;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class Surface extends JPanel {
double a1 = 0.745455;
double b1 = -0.459091;
double d1 = 0.406061;
double e1 = 0.887121;
double c1 = 1.460279;
double f1 = 0.691072;
double p1 = 0.912675;

double a2 = -0.424242;
double b2 = -0.065152;
double d2 = -0.175758;
double e2 = -0.218182;
double c2 = 3.809567;
double f2 = 6.741476;
double p2 = 0.087325;

double x1(double x, double y) {
    return a1 * x + b1 * y + c1;
}

double y1(double x, double y) {
    return d1 * x + e1 * y + f1;
}

double x2(double x, double y) {
    return a2 * x + b2 * y + c2;
}

double y2(double x, double y) {
    return d2 * x + e2 * y + f2;
}

public void paint(Graphics g) {
    drawFractal(g);
}

void drawFractal(Graphics g) {
    double x1 = 300;
    double y1 = 300;
    double x2 = 0;
    double y2 = 0;
    g.fillOval(300 + (int) x1, 300 + (int) y1, 3, 3);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
        double p = Math.random();
        if (p < 0.91675) {
            x2 = x1(x1, y1);
            y2 = y1(x1, y1);
            g.fillOval(300 + (int) x2, 300 + (int) y2, 3, 3);
            x1 = x2;
            y1 = y2;
        } else {
            x2 = x2(x1, y1);
            y2 = y2(x1, y1);
            g.fillOval(300 + (int) x2, 300 + (int) y2, 3, 3);
            x1 = x2;
            y1 = y2;
        }
    }
}
}

Unfortunately, with this code I get a wrong picture:

Current Fractal Image

It would be great if someone could point out my mistake.

share|improve this question
2  
Are the coefficients correct and complete? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 12:13
2  
The naming collision between a local variable and a method is probably a bad idea. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 12:16
2  
what happen when you iterate not only 10000 but 100K times or 1M times –  UmNyobe Dec 23 '12 at 12:19
2  
2  
I've got them from task at university, also I've seen it here fractalworld.xaoc.ru/IFS_collection (look for "swirl") –  Nostia Dec 23 '12 at 12:50
show 15 more comments

closed as too localized by Blorgbeard, Bohemian, Meff, Sean Owen, RB. Dec 24 '12 at 12:08

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3 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Your generation seems correct (i.e. don't do x1 = x2 +300; y1 = y2 +300;), but your problem is you're way off the scale for the purposes of rendering. This means there are very few points that fall outside very center of the image.

Your window is [0..600]x[0..600]. Try multiplying x2 and y2 with 50, so that you're rendering the [-6..6]x[-6..6] region instead of the [-300..300]x[-300..300] region of space.

Note that it should be sufficient to draw single pixels (as lines to itself) instead of 3x3 ovals.

int xp = 300 + (int) (x2 * scale);
int yp = 300 + (int) (y2 * scale);
g.drawLine(xp, yp, xp, yp);

Depending on what gets rendered, you might need to adjust the scale slightly to get the entire image with reasonable bounds. Note the second transformation offsets by -6.7, so a scale of 30 should be about right.

Also note that by using x1 = x2 +300; y1 = y2 +300; you change the transformations and get a different fractal (at a scale at which you expect).

share|improve this answer
    
Finally I got right fractal!! :) Thanks for explanation, now I see my mistakes –  Nostia Dec 23 '12 at 14:44
    
nice Jan! I thought about this too, but I made the mistake to keep using scaled values xp, yp for the fractal and gave up solving this :). –  UmNyobe Dec 24 '12 at 11:25
    
+1 - Nice analysis. –  Andrew Cheong Dec 24 '12 at 21:38
add comment

This is great, I was wrong thinking that exponential runtime required! The fractals appeared more dimensional than my imagination!

Thanks @Jan Dvorak!

The following also works (in my coordinates, xcenter=300, ycenter=100 and radius=50 are global drawing parameters) and works faster:

void drawFractal2(Graphics g) {

        double x1 = 0;
        double y1 = 0;
        double x2 = 0;
        double y2 = 0;
        double p;

        g.fillOval(xcenter + (int) (x1 * radius), ycenter + (int) (y1 * radius), 3, 3);

        for(int i=0; i<100000; ++i) {
            p = Math.random();

            if (p < p1) {
                x2 = x1(x1, y1);
                y2 = y1(x1, y1);

            }
            else {
                x2 = x2(x1, y1);
                y2 = y2(x1, y1);

            }

            g.fillOval(xcenter + (int) (x2 * radius), ycenter + (int) (y2 * radius), 3, 3);
            x1 = x2;
            y1 = y2;
        }

    }

and the picture is better

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for testing my fix, buddy :-) –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 14:21
    
You are welcome pal :) –  Suzan Cioc Dec 23 '12 at 14:22
    
Note that "tree-like runtime" is, technically, nonsense. You can have "tree-like recursion", which then experiences "exponential runtime" ;) –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 14:23
    
Yes now I see it, thanks! –  Suzan Cioc Dec 23 '12 at 14:24
    
Would you mind giving me some credit in the answer? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 14:25
show 5 more comments

BELOW IS MY INCORRECT ANSWER

But it show how fractals are bigger than the intuition, so I keep it.

I guess your algorithm should be tree-like (recursive) while your one is linear. You are just drawing one chain of points, transforming it one after one. So you get some spiral-like chain. It can't generate any fractal picture in principle.

I GOT YOUR PICTURE

You have 2 mistakes:

1) you pass 300 both into iteration and as drawing shift. This is minor.

2) You algorithm is linear. Linear algorithm can't draw tree-like picture. If you use random values, you should run algorithm multiple times. One chain draws only one random portion of the picture.

I got your picture with following recursive algorithm. It works slow but you are to improve it.

  void drawFractal(Graphics g, double x1, double y1, int depth) {

        double x2 = 0;
        double y2 = 0;

        if( depth > 20 ) {
            return;
        }

        g.fillOval(xcenter + (int) (x1 * radius), ycenter + (int) (y1 * radius), 3, 3);

        x2 = x1(x1, y1);
        y2 = y1(x1, y1);
        drawFractal(g, x2, y2, depth+1);



        x2 = x2(x1, y1);
        y2 = y2(x1, y1);
        drawFractal(g, x2, y2, depth+1);






    }

to run it I used

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        //drawFractal(g);
        drawFractal(g, 0, 0, 0);
    }

parameters are

    int xcenter = 300;
    int ycenter = 100;

    int radius = 50;

the picture is follows:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
This is how IFS works. Note the transformation is chosen at random from a set of two - one transformation would, indeed, not be enough. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 13:37
    
No, you are wrong. Choosing random won't help. –  Suzan Cioc Dec 23 '12 at 13:55
    
Read up on IFS or do some hand simulation. That's the beauty of Iterated Function Systems. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 13:55
1  
"You algorithm is linear. Linear algorithm can't draw tree-like picture." -- still wrong. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 14:04
1  
Your claim that you need manual branching is incorrect. You solved the problem by applying the correct scale - which the asker didn't - not by switching to tree-like recursion. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 23 '12 at 14:10
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