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My problem is as follows; I have two vectors u and v. I have computed a table of cross-ratios like so:

[ u1/v1, u1/v2, u1/v3, u1/v4, ... ]
[ u2/v1, u2/v2, u1/v3, u2/v4, ... ]
[ u3/v1, u3/v2, u1/v3, u3/v4, ... ]
[ u4/v1, u4/v2, u1/v3, u4/v4, ... ]
[ ...

My task now is to compute a histogram of these cross ratios. However, it is clear that using linear histogram bins would not make sense - any ratios below 1 would have a far lower sample resolution than the ratios above 1, and the long-tailed nature of the ratio distribution means that my choice of bins would be skewed heavily by large values.

So, my question is: is there a 'correct', or at least better, choice of histogram bins (or equivalently, a transformation to apply to the data) for this situation? I can see that the Cauchy distribution might be relevant although I'm quite sure how.

Many thanks in advance.

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Have you considered plotting the histogram of the log of the ratio? This works as long as your values are strictly positive, and has the nice property that log(u1/v1) = -log(v1/u1). –  Adam Bowen Dec 23 '12 at 13:50
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@AdamBowen - in that case, I suggest two things: (1) use reallog instead of log - should be faster. (2) compute reallog(u)-reallog(v) instead of reallog(u/v), again, should be more efficient. –  Shai Dec 23 '12 at 14:54
    
Thanks @AdamBowen, that property exactly sums up what I was looking for! If you were to submit that as an answer I will happily accept it as correct. –  jazzbassrob Dec 23 '12 at 15:42
    
Also thanks @Shai for your comments, I will keep them in mind. –  jazzbassrob Dec 23 '12 at 15:43
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try plotting the histogram of the log of the ratios. This works as long as your values are strictly positive, and has the nice property that log(u1/v1) = -log(v1/u1).

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You may calibrate the histogram's bins manually using histc.

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