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I have two overloads of operator(), one that takes a function reference that takes any type as its parameters and returns any type. And another one which takes a function reference that takes any type as its parameter but returns void. Upon instantiation of my class I get the following errors:

In instantiation of 'A<void, int>':
error: 'void A<T, F>::operator()(void (&)(F)) [with T = void, F = int]' cannot be overloaded
error: with 'void A<T, F>::operator()(T (&)(F)) [with T = void, F = int]'

template <typename T, typename F> struct A {
    void operator()(T (&)(F)) {}
    void operator()(void (&)(F)) {}
};

void f(int) {}

int main() {

    A<void, int> a;
    a(f);
}

These errors only occur when the first template argument T is void. I would like to know what I'm doing wrong and why I can't overload operator() this way?

share|improve this question
2  
You have defined two functions named operator() with identical signatures. What did you expect? – n.m. Dec 23 '12 at 13:42
    
@n.m. If and only if T is void do I want to use the second operator() overload. That's basically what I was trying to do but Pubby cleared it up for me. – template boy Dec 23 '12 at 13:43
    
for the same reason why std::tuple has a broken constructor specification. see stackoverflow.com/questions/11386042/… – Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 23 '12 at 13:55
    
The language/compiler doesn't know which definition you want to use, so it flags an error. There's no easy way to tell the compiler "if there are two, I want to use this one", so you have to provide only one definition. Pubby's suggestion is one way to make sure there's only one; another way is to use SFINAE and something like std::enable_if. If your struct A ever grows too large to specialize conveniently, you may want to research this second option. – n.m. Dec 23 '12 at 14:06
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Well, if T is void then you have two function definitions with the exact same prototype - breaking ODR.

Try specializing your struct to prevent this:

template <typename T, typename F> struct A {
    void operator()(T (&)(F)) {}
    void operator()(void (&)(F)) {}
};

template <typename F> struct A<void, F> {
    void operator()(void (&)(F)) {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help! Question: What is ODR? – template boy Dec 23 '12 at 13:51
1  
@templateboy *One Definition Rule – enobayram Dec 23 '12 at 13:54

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