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I want to achieve the below requirement; please suggest some solution.

string[] filenames = Directory.GetFiles("C:\Temp"); //10 files

for (int i = 0; i < filenames.count; i++)    
{
    ProcessFile(filenames[i]); //it takes time to execute    
}

I wanted to implement multi-threading. e.g There are 10 files. I wanted to process 3 files at a time (configurable, say maxthreadcount). So 3 files will be processed in 3 threads from the for loop and if any thread completes the execution, it should pick the next item from the for loop. Also wanted to ensure all the files are processed before it exits the for loop.

Please suggest best approach.

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Are you really stuck on .NET 2.0? There are going to be much better approaches in .NET 3.5, or better yet 4.0. –  Joe White Dec 23 '12 at 13:44
    
@Joe : Any suggestion using ThreadPool or Semaphore? –  SAM Dec 23 '12 at 14:01
3  
No, except: FORGET IT, unless your processing is CPU intensive. The Disc does not get magically faster. IO will be a serious bottleneck contenter. –  TomTom Dec 23 '12 at 14:06
1  
Because unless it does a LOT, the IO WILL be the bottleneck. Seriously. You have any idea how SLOW a disc actually is compared to a CPU core? It will ake a LOT of processing to balance that. –  TomTom Dec 23 '12 at 14:36
1  
@TomTom The bottleneck might not happen if the file doesn't take a while to read. Maybe the "it takes time to execute" is tied to processing the data from the file once it's loaded, in this case it's a good idea to go multi-thread for this. If the delay is because the file takes a long time to read, then I would suggest to forget about multithreading. For an example of the time lost, copy a huge file between 2 HDDs and look at the ETA - then copy a second file on top of it and see how the ETA more than doubles! You really want to read just 1 file at a time ;) –  Joe Dec 23 '12 at 16:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This will do the job in .net 2.0:

class Program
{

    static int workingCounter = 0;
    static int workingLimit = 10;
    static int processedCounter = 0;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string[] files = Directory.GetFiles("C:\\Temp");
        int checkCount = files.Length;
        foreach (string file in files)
        {
            //wait for free limit...
            while (workingCounter >= workingLimit)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }
            workingCounter += 1;
            ParameterizedThreadStart pts = new ParameterizedThreadStart(ProcessFile);
            Thread th = new Thread(pts);
            th.Start(file);
        }
        //wait for all threads to complete...
        while (processedCounter< checkCount)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(100);
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Work completed!");
    }

    static void ProcessFile(object file)
    {
        try
        {
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString() + " recieved: " + file + " thread count is: " + workingCounter.ToString());
            //make some sleep for demo...
            Thread.Sleep(2000);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //handle your exception...
            string exMsg = ex.Message;
        }
        finally
        {
            Interlocked.Decrement(ref workingCounter);
            Interlocked.Increment(ref processedCounter);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you take this approach, be sure to do proper exception handling. If you don't decrement the workingCounter on exception, it will cause issues. –  CodingWithSpike Dec 23 '12 at 14:51
2  
There is an issue with decrementing workingCounter - that isn't an atomic operation. Two threads might decrement at the same time and the counter will only be decremented once. It's better to use Interlocked.Decrement(ref workingCounter). –  ytoledano Dec 23 '12 at 15:04
    
I have incorporated both suggestions by @CodingWithSpike and ytoledano to make this sample more robust –  Gregor Primar Dec 23 '12 at 15:16
    
@GregorPrimar : how would I ensure that all the threads have been completed their execution before the For Loop exits using above code? I tried above code, but the for loop exits, before threads complete their execution. –  SAM Dec 23 '12 at 15:41
    
Have you incorporated try->catch inside your code like in updated sample? When call leaves ProcessFile (ultimately inside finally block) then thread is about to complete. If any exception was raised you should handle it inside catch block. –  Gregor Primar Dec 23 '12 at 15:48

Take a look at the Producer/Consumer Queue example by Joe Albahari. It should provide a good starting point for what you're trying to accomplish.

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Try

Parallel.For(0, filenames.Length, i => {
    ProcessFile(filenames[i]);
});

MSDN

It's only available since .Net 4. Hope that acceptable.

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Unfortunately the application is targeted for 2.0. Any other suggestion? –  SAM Dec 23 '12 at 14:19

You could use the ThreadPool.

Example:

ThreadPool.SetMaxThreads(3, 3);

for (int i = 0; i < filenames.count; i++)    
{
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(ProcessFile), filenames[i]);
}

static void ProcessFile(object fileNameObj)
{
    var fileName = (string)fileNameObj;
    // do your processing here.
}

If you are using the ThreadPool elsewhere in your application then this would not be a good solution since it is shared across your app.

You could also grab a different thread pool implementation, for example SmartThreadPool

share|improve this answer
1  
How would I stop the For loop to get exit before all thread complete the function ProcessFile()? –  SAM Dec 23 '12 at 16:17

Rather than starting a thread for each file name, put the file names into a queue and then start up three threads to process them. Or, since the main thread is now free, start up two threads and let the main thread work on it, too:

Queue<string> MyQueue;

void MyProc()
{
    string[] filenames = Directory.GetFiles(...);
    MyQueue = new Queue(filenames);

    // start two threads
    Thread t1 = new Thread((ThreadStart)ProcessQueue);
    Thread t2 = new Thread((ThreadStart)ProcessQueue);
    t1.Start();
    t2.Start();

    // main thread processes the queue, too!
    ProcessQueue();

    // wait for threads to complete
    t1.Join();
    t2.Join();
}

private object queueLock = new object();

void ProcessQueue()
{
    while (true)
    {
        string s;
        lock (queueLock)
        {
            if (MyQueue.Count == 0)
            {
                // queue is empty
                return;
            }
            s = MyQueue.Dequeue();
        }
        ProcessFile(s);
    }
}

Another option is to use a semaphore to control how many threads are working:

Semaphore MySem = new Semaphore(3, 3);

void MyProc()
{
    string[] filenames = Directory.GetFiles(...);

    foreach (string s in filenames)
    {
        mySem.WaitOne();
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(ProcessFile, s);
    }

    // wait for all threads to finish
    int count = 0;
    while (count < 3)
    {
        mySem.WaitOne();
        ++count;
    }
}

void ProcessFile(object state)
{
    string fname = (string)state;
    // do whatever
    mySem.Release();  // release so another thread can start
}

The first will perform somewhat better because you don't have the overhead of starting and stopping a thread for each file name processed. The second is much shorter and cleaner, though, and takes full advantage of the thread pool. Likely you won't notice the performance difference.

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Can set max threads unsing ParallelOptions

Parallel.For Method (Int32, Int32, ParallelOptions, Action)

ParallelOptions.MaxDegreeOfParallelism

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Unfortunately the target is 2.0 :( –  SAM Dec 23 '12 at 16:19
var results = filenames.ToArray().AsParallel().Select(filename=>ProcessFile(filename)).ToArray();

bool ProcessFile(object fileNameObj)
{
    var fileName = (string)fileNameObj;

    // do your processing here.

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
He said .NET 2.0. –  Jim Mischel Aug 1 '13 at 19:42
    
If you have a new question, please ask it by clicking the Ask Question button. Include a link to this question if it helps provide context. –  Afshin Mehrabani Aug 1 '13 at 19:44

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