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  • summary

    typeof(ISomeInterface).BaseType is null; typeof(object).BaseType is also null by definition. Thus:

    typeof(object).BaseType==typeof(ISomeInterface).BaseType -> true 
    

    It could (semantically) mean System.Object is an interface, too, doesn't it? In c#, all classes inherit from System.Object, but interfaces do not. Interfaces in fact are contracts, not the base type of any class, and can only derive from other interfaces.

    So I'm wondering whether typeof(object).BaseType should be the same as interfaces?

  • explanation

    I thought this in the way of elementary mathematical logic. I treated null as 0 and typeof(object) as 1, so that finding the base types of some type are just like finding the factors of a number.

    Under this assumption, null could be the derivation of any type, like 0 is a multiple by a factor of any number. And typeof(object) would be the base type of any class, like 1 is a factor of any number even itself. The actual returning null of typeof(object).BaseType, however, broke this assumption. This seems saying that 0 is a factor of 1 but not of any other number.

    Further, if we use a method to find the base type of SomeType recursively, we cannot always say SomeType is not a class because of its BaseType is null, typeof(object).BaseType is also null.

    It seems paradoxical if

    typeof(object).BaseType==typeof(object) -> true 
    

    to present that its base type is itself, but isn't that exactly the difference between entities and contracts?


update:

I originally stated that:

It could mean System.Object is an interface, too, doesn't it?

What I want to say is it seems confused. It's my fault of the poorly expressed description, and sorry to cause the answers focused on that.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Fox32, Brian Gianforcaro, walther, gaige May 13 '13 at 0:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
I think this is logical. The base type for an interface is null, as you concluded yourself. Also, System.Object is the base of all .net classes, and itself, does not have a base class, so that results in a null as well. Seems logical to me. –  Elad Lachmi Dec 23 '12 at 13:59
9  
The current king of France is a non-existing person. The current king of Siam is a non-existing person. If two things are both equal to the same thing, then they are equal to each other. Therefore, the king of France is also the king of Siam. Is that logic correct? Remember, "null" means "does not exist" in this context. –  Eric Lippert Dec 23 '12 at 14:58
2  
Is it correct that typeof(object).BaseType returns null like an typeof(ISomeInterface).BaseType does? Those two cases return null by definition. It is a boundary case, and some developer at microsoft thought that returning null in both cases would be the proper solution. –  Thomas C. G. de Vilhena Dec 23 '12 at 19:12
4  
Actually the "King of France" argument rests on whether you define "non-existence" to be a value or an attribute (because in English "is" is ambiguous as to which is intended). If you define non-existence to be a value, then yes they are the same. But if you define it to be an attribute then no they are not the same. Thus "the queen of England is a Queen" and "the queen of Denmark is a Queen" are both true statements. Nonetheless, they are still different people. –  RBarryYoung Dec 25 '12 at 3:16
    
@RBarryYoung: I like the equivocation: "Nothing is better than Filet Mignon. Fast-food burger is better than nothing. Therefore, fast-food burger is better than Filet Mignon." –  supercat Feb 4 '13 at 0:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The BaseType property returns the base type for types that have a base type. For all other types, it returns a value indicating that the type does not have a base type. You posed the following expression in the original question:

typeof(object).BaseType == typeof(SomeInterface).BaseType

Then you suggested that since this expression is true, Object and SomeInterface appear to have the same base type. However, your conclusion is flawed because it assumes the existence of a base type for both Object and SomeInterface, when the documentation for the method explicitly states that this is not the case.

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1  
If an instance of type T is always an instance of T (trivially true), then any statement that T is the base type of T is redundant. System.Object does not, and cannot, have a base type which is not trivially redundant. It is based on itself because it is itself. –  280Z28 Dec 24 '12 at 17:01

Classes and Interfaces are two different things. The following expression:

typeof(object).BaseType == typeof(SomeInterface).BaseType

Is true only because the following is also true:

null == null

And, by definition, BaseType returns null if the current type represents the object class or an interface.

It could mean System.Object is an interface, too, doesn't it?

Actually not, because an interface contains only the signatures of methods, but not their implementation. You can think an interface as a contract that classes must implement.

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typeof(object).BaseType returns null because of MSDN says;

Object is the only type that does not have a base type, therefore null is returned as the base type of Object.

You can't use it BasType property with an Interface. Let's look at this piece of code;

using System;

namespace Programs
{
    public interface IBar { }
    public interface IFoo : IBar { }

    public  class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Type[] types = typeof(IFoo).GetInterfaces();

            foreach ( var t in types )
            {
                Console.WriteLine(t.ToString());
            }
        }
    }
}

Output:

Programs.IBar


Interfaces inherit from zero or more base interfaces; therefore, this property returns null if the Type object represents an interface. The base interfaces can be determined with GetInterfaces or FindInterfaces.


Let's look at one more code;

using System;

namespace Programs
{
    public interface IBar { }
    public interface IFoo : IBar { }
    public interface IZoo : IFoo { }

    public  class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Type[] types = typeof(IZoo).GetInterfaces();

            foreach ( var t in types )
            {
                Console.WriteLine(t.ToString());
            }
        }
    }
}

Output is:

Programs.IFoo

Programs.IBar


The question is, we got the null either with typeof(object).BaseType. It could means System.Object is an interface, too, doesn't it?

No, System.Object is not an Interface. It is a class. It supports all classes in the .NET Framework class hierarchy.

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2  
BaseType also returns null for pointer types (e.g. typeof(int*)) and byref types (e.g. typeof(int).MakeByRefType()). The documentation does not indicate this. –  280Z28 Dec 24 '12 at 4:02
1  
@KenKin No, it's not. In an unsafe code, a type may be a pointer type. Look at documentation –  Soner Gönül Dec 25 '12 at 6:30
    
Thank you very much. But, doesn't unsafe code breaks the rules of OO? –  Ken Kin Dec 25 '12 at 6:49
2  
@KenKin No, not true. Read Safer unsafe code for .NET –  Soner Gönül Dec 25 '12 at 6:55

Just a note: interfaces are not types in a sense that classes and structs are! Interfaces do not exist by themselves.

Classes and structs are types for data(code) but interfaces are types for types. They can be used for categorizing other types. They force other types to follow a protocol and nothing more. They are just a layout, a definition, a contract; not an existing thing.

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1  
Yes, and interfaces do not derive from System.Object. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Dec 23 '12 at 15:55

There are a number of types in .net which are "special", including System.Object, System.ValueType, and System.Enum, whose behavior in the inheritance hierarchy is unique. For example, any type T which derives from System.ValueType will a value type, unless T is either System.ValueType or System.Enum, both of which are class types. The lack of a base type for Object can probably be viewed in similar light--every type which lacks a base type is an interface, except for System.Object which is an oddball.

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Thanks for answering a question have already an accepting answer. –  Ken Kin Feb 4 '13 at 0:17
1  
@KenKin: I thought it noteworthy that there are a number of places in the interface that effectively say "All types that share some characteristic with XX, except for XX itself, have some characteristic YY", but none of the other answers seemed to mention such examples. –  supercat Feb 4 '13 at 0:27

"It could (semantically) mean System.Object is an interface, too, doesn't it?"

No, that assumption relies on these assumptions:

  • The BaseType property always returns the base type of a type
  • Two types having the same base type are the same

When typeof(object).BaseType returns null it doesn't mean that the base type is null, it means that there is no base type at all. So, when typeof(ISomeInterface).BaseType also returns null it doesn't mean that it has the same base type as object, it means that it too has no base type at all.

Even if object and interfaces had the same base type, it wouldn't mean that object is an interface. The types int and double for example have the same base type, but that doesn't mean that they are the same.

share|improve this answer
    
The first bullet point is what I suppose it should be. The second bullet point, it would mean each of them is their base type, that is, an (instance of) int is a ValueType and a double is a ValueType also, not an int is a double. Thus, an instance of SomeType implies it is also an instance of SomeType's base type. However, BaseType of System.Object doesn't return System.Object, that breaks the assumption, and one cannot use BaseType to determine whether SomeType is a class or not. –  Ken Kin May 5 '13 at 10:21
    
@KenKin: The first bullet point is not true, because there isn't always a base type. The second bullet point would be needed to take you from the assumption "object has the same base type as interface" to "object is an interface". –  Guffa May 5 '13 at 11:49
    
Exactly, and that's why I wondered it's designed in this way; I thought that would make BaseType lesser useful. Most of all, thank you very much, for answering an old question. –  Ken Kin May 5 '13 at 13:23

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