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Back in my C/C++ days, coding an "infinite loop" as

while ( true )

felt more natural and seemed more obvious to me as opposed to

for ( ; ; )

An encounter with PC-lint in the late 1980's and subsequent best practices discussions broke me of this habit. I have since coded the loops using the for control statement. Today, for the first time in a long while, and perhaps my first need for an infinite loop as a C# developer, I am facing the same situation. Is one of them correct and the other not?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Lundin, Bill the Lizard Nov 25 '13 at 12:15

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Four identical answers in under two minutes. Not bad. –  Jon B Sep 9 '09 at 18:09
3  
You could avoid the whole religious argument by unrolling your infinite loop. Shouldn't take long... –  Stephen Darlington Sep 9 '09 at 18:23
5  
Just out of curiosity: why is for(;;) better in C/C++? –  Vilx- Sep 9 '09 at 18:47
5  
@Vilx as I recall it, old compilers used to write more efficient code with for(;;) than while(1). I'm sure that any decent modern compiler will output pretty much identical code. –  Stephen Darlington Sep 9 '09 at 21:55
3  
Building on Stephen and Serhio's comments: 1. while(true) requires a condition. for(;;) is therefore a better representation for infinite loops which repeat unconditionally. 2. Old unoptimizing compilers may have actually evaluated the (true) as it looped. 3. C is a minimalist language from the days of teletypes, 300 baud terminals, and 1-char variable names. In an environment where every key stroke counts, for(;;) is quite a bit shorter than while(true). –  Richard Dingwall Mar 11 '11 at 11:26

22 Answers 22

up vote 77 down vote accepted
while(true)
{

}

Is always what I've used and what I've seen others use for a loop that has to be broken manually.

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Unfortunately, yes! –  Adam Robinson Sep 9 '09 at 18:28
    
We should get to share the answer on this or something... –  RSolberg Sep 9 '09 at 18:29
    
@RSolberg - it was a toss-up between the two similar responses offered within seconds of one another. Adam's follow-up comment led me to accepting an answer based on usage rather than convention. –  Bob Kaufman Sep 9 '09 at 18:30
    
while and for can both be broken manually –  Allen Rice Sep 9 '09 at 18:42
    
Congratulation on the 10k reputation –  Pierre-Alain Vigeant Sep 9 '09 at 18:45

The C# compiler will transform

for(; ; )
{
}

into

while (true)
{
}

The IL for both is the same. Most people find while(true) to be easier to read and understand. for(;;) is rather cryptic.

Edit

I messed a little more with Reflector and I compiled both loop with the "Optimize Code" on in Visual Studio.

Both loop compile into (with Reflector)

Label_0000:
    goto Label_0000;

Raptors should attack soon.

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5  
yup, just double checked, its all the same IL code, this should be the accepted answer IMO :) –  Allen Rice Sep 9 '09 at 18:25
30  
+1 for the xkcd reference –  Ikke Sep 9 '09 at 18:38
3  
Best answer in the thread for sure. –  KingNestor Sep 9 '09 at 18:43
3  
To be pedantic, the compiler does not transform one statement form into the other; rather, it generates identical code for both statements. That code is identical to a goto statement, btw, which is no surprise. –  David R Tribble Sep 9 '09 at 18:48
13  
so obviously goto LOOP is the correct C# infinite loop :) –  Dustin Getz Sep 9 '09 at 20:09

I think that this may be easier to read and is definitely the standard for use in C#:

while(true)
{
   //Do My Loop Stuff
}
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1  
Any seasoned developer would understand while(1){/**/}. Those extra keystrokes don't come free you know! :) –  voyager Sep 9 '09 at 18:12
15  
@voyager: 1 is not a substitute for 'true' in C#. –  Adam Robinson Sep 9 '09 at 18:13
6  
@voyager: I code for the unseasoned... –  RSolberg Sep 9 '09 at 18:13
14  
Note that while(1) is invalid C#: Constant 1 cannot be converted to bool –  Vinko Vrsalovic Sep 9 '09 at 18:13
3  
while(1) isn't valid in C#, since 1 is not a bool. –  Pavel Minaev Sep 9 '09 at 18:13

Gasp, what about

while (!false)
{

}

OR as jsight pointed out, you may want to be doubly sure

while (!false && true)
{
}

Before people yell at me, its all the same IL code, I checked :)

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22  
I prefer to be doubly sure: while (!false && true) –  jsight Sep 9 '09 at 18:16
    
@jsight, heh, that also gets converted to the same IL code :) –  Allen Rice Sep 9 '09 at 18:18
    
But what about all that unnecessary work you're putting the poor compiler through? –  Michael Burr Sep 9 '09 at 18:20
    
@Burr, damn you're right, he didn't specify "best" at runtime or compile time lol –  Allen Rice Sep 9 '09 at 18:21
7  
Or : while(false || (true && (!false && (true || false)))). It also works and compiles to the same IL. –  Moayad Mardini Sep 9 '09 at 18:54

To rehash a couple of old jokes:

  1. Don't use "for (;;) {}" — it makes the statement cry.
  2. Unless, of course, you "#define EVER ;;".
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16  
Or #define ever (;;) which I think is more readable. for ever {} –  Chris Lutz Sep 9 '09 at 18:17
1  
I didnt think you could do a #define ever (;;) in C#, though, the joke is funny :) –  Allen Rice Sep 9 '09 at 18:29
1  
Ah. I program C on OS X. I didn't know the C# preprocessor was so castrated. I'm not even sure how I started reading this question, I have C# as an ignored tag... –  Chris Lutz Sep 9 '09 at 18:43
    
The C# preprocessor is not really a preprocessor, at least not in terms of what C, C++, PL/1, and even macro assemblers provide. It only allows you to enable or disable blocks of code by defining/undefining preprocessor symbols. –  David R Tribble Sep 9 '09 at 18:51
4  
Or even better: #define forever while(true) ;) –  Roberto Bonvallet Sep 16 '09 at 0:17

I think while (true) is a bit more readable.

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If you want to go old-school. Goto is still supported in C#

STARTOVER:  
    //Do something
    goto STARTOVER;

For a truly infinite loop, this is the go-to command. =)

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8  
xkcd.com/292 –  Callum Rogers Sep 9 '09 at 18:40
4  
I upvoted this from a negative rating back to zero, but only because of its humor value. Hey, all loops get compiled into JMP assembler opcodes anyway, right? –  David R Tribble Sep 9 '09 at 18:44
    
@Loadmaster: Thanks, I was just throwing it out there as another option, not necessarily endorsing it. –  JohnFx Sep 9 '09 at 19:09
1  
@serhio: Even more so is avoiding language constructs out of hand because you read something somewhere. No language element by itself is bad, it can only be used in bad ways. –  JohnFx Jul 4 '10 at 15:51
1  
FORTRAN 66/77!! –  Killercam Feb 7 '12 at 10:02

In those situations where I needed a true infinite loop, I've always used

while(true) {...}

It seems to express intent better than an empty for statement.

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Personally, I have always preferred for(;;) precisely because it has no condition (as opposed to while (true) which has an always-true one). However, this is really a very minor style point, which I don't feel is worth arguing about either way. I've yet to see a C# style guideline that mandated or forbade either approach.

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don't worth in .NET, when compiler transforms your (bad readable) for without condition in a while with condition. –  serhio Jul 4 '10 at 14:53
1  
@serhio: please explain what you mean by "compiler transforms ... in a while". As far as programmer is concerned, the compiler transforms high-level code into IL. There are no while (or for) loops in IL, only labels and gotos. –  Pavel Minaev Jul 4 '10 at 19:26
    
see Pierre-Alain Vigeant 's answer. –  serhio Jul 5 '10 at 8:42
2  
His answer can be better rephrased as simply "the compiler generates identical IL for both" (you don't really know if and when it transforms anything on AST level, and it's an implementation detail in any case). In any case, this doesn't explain why it's "not worth it in .NET". The same is also true of C++, Java... –  Pavel Minaev Jul 5 '10 at 14:54

I personally prefer the for (;;) idiom (coming from a C/C++ point of view). While I agree that the while (true) is more readable in a sense (and it's what I used way back when even in C/C++), I've turned to using the for idiom because:

  • it stands out

I think the fact that a loop doesn't terminate (in a normal fashion) is worth 'calling out', and I think that the for (;;) does this a bit more.

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finally, using that we will wait a little more that the programs compile(compile transformation from for=>while) –  serhio Jul 4 '10 at 14:50
2  
@serhio: Not really. It doesn't transform it from for to while. For both for (;;){} and while (true){}, it generates new while(true){} code. See this answer. –  WChargin Aug 25 '12 at 21:23

Who cares. It's not like if you stumble across a for(;;) in source control you're going to replace it with a while(true). Arguing this is like arguing brace placement.

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3  
Trying to start a holy war, are you? –  David R Tribble Sep 9 '09 at 18:56

It should be while(true) not while(1), so while(1) is incorrect in C#, yes ;)

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I know in the C++ world Stroustrup advocates for(;;) in TC++PL, but I don't recall why.

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Many C++ compilers warn about the condition never changing in while(true). Maybe that's the reason? –  sbi Sep 9 '09 at 19:06
    
No, it's from the original K&R white book for C (see my answer at 9/9 18:41). So it's historical, althought there was a deliberate design in making all three controlling expressions in the for loop to be optional. –  David R Tribble Sep 15 '09 at 17:47

The original K&R book for C, from which C# can trace its ancestry, recommended

for (;;) ...

for infinite loops. It's unambiguous, easy to read, and has a long and noble history behind it.

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yes, but this is for C, not for C#. –  serhio Jul 5 '10 at 9:11
    
It works in C#. And the C# language was derived (indirectly) from C. –  David R Tribble Jul 5 '10 at 19:43

I prefer slightly more "literate" code. I'm much more likely to do something like this in practice:

bool shouldContinue = true;
while (shouldContinue)
{
    // ...

    shouldContinue = CheckSomething();
}
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1  
Ugh. Actutally, that's a do ... while() loop in disguise. It just took me a few seconds to see that. Had you written a do ... while() loop, it would have been clear immediately. -1 –  sbi Sep 9 '09 at 19:08
    
why waste time and resources declaring a variable when you can use while(true)? It doesn't make sense in my opinion –  waqasahmed Sep 9 '09 at 22:26
    
I find it more readable, especially if you can attach a specific meaningful flag, e.g. "while (!this.canceled)" to indicate that cancellation is the only way to stop the loop, "while (!processExited)" to indicate the loop should run until an external process goes away, etc. There are lots of things that arguably "waste resources" that are absolutely the right thing to do in the name of ease of maintainability or readability. "while (true)" isn't all that bad, but in my experience there's usually a better way. –  bobbymcr Sep 9 '09 at 22:54
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+1. In most cases, a true infinite loop isn't what actually happens, and you do have some condition where you'd wish to stop (e.g. when the printer is on fire). –  Lie Ryan Sep 27 '10 at 21:56
1  
… in which case you should use break. –  minitech Oct 12 '13 at 19:33

Even i also say below one is better :)

while(true)
{

}
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yeah, its better! –  Steve Sep 9 '09 at 19:55

If you're code-golfing, I would suggest for(;;). Beyond that, while(true) has the same meaning and seems more intuitive. At any rate, most coders will likely understand both variations, so it doesn't really matter. Use what's most comfortable.

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1  
if you're golfing then C# is the wrong language anyway. –  IfLoop Sep 16 '09 at 0:05

both of them have same function but people generally prefer while(true) it feels easy to read and understand..

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the only reason I'd say for(;;) is due the CodeDOM limitations (While loops can't be declared using codedom and for loops are seen as the more general form as an iteration loop).

this is a pretty loose reason to choose this other than the fact that the for loop implementation can be used both for normal code and codedom generated code. ie can be more standard.

as a note, you can use code snippets to create a while loop, but the whole loop would need to be a snippet...

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Alternatively one could say having an infinite loop is normally bad practice anyway, since it needs an exit condition unless the app really runs forever. However, if this is for a cruise missile I will accept an explicit exit condition might not be required.

Though I do like this one:

for (float f = 16777216f; f < 16777217f; f++) { }
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1  
-1: not everyone will understand your "infinite loop" reading the code, perhaps somebody could think this is a bug and try to "fix" it... –  serhio Jul 5 '10 at 9:13

Any expression that always returns true should be OK for while loop.

Example:

1==1 //Just an example for the text stated before 
true
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Why would you ever bother forcing it to do a comparison like 1=1 when true works just as well? Using a calculated expression feels about as silly as defining a constant like NUMBER_OF_ARMS = 598-3596; –  JohnFx Sep 9 '09 at 18:35
    
Its an example for the answer stated before the code :) –  George Sep 9 '09 at 18:39

In terms of code readability while(true) in whatever language I feel makes more sense. In terms of how the computer sees it there really shouldn't be any difference in today's society of very efficient compilers and interpreters.

If there is any performance difference to be had I'm sure the translation to MSIL will optimise away. You could check that if you really wanted to.

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