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Consider enum Animals { DOG, FISH, GOAT }; in Java.

Now the variable of type Animals can point to member objects of this type:

Animals a1 = Animals.DOG; that's fine.

But how do the following chain references makes sense ?

Animals a2 = a1.DOG.FISH.GOAT; (yea, looks crazy, seen this in a tricky Java question)

what does a1 really point to ? and how are we referencing other enum members from it ?

Example:

public class EnumTest {
    enum Animals { DOG, FISH, GOAT };

    public void test(){
        Animals a1 = Animals.DOG;
        Animals a2 = a1.DOG.FISH.GOAT; //--Strange but valid--
    }
}
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Is this valid Java syntax? Never saw something like that. And even if it is valid, I guess it's the same as Animals.GOAT so it's just obfuscating the real intention. –  Koraktor Dec 23 '12 at 14:42
4  
You're referencing a static member through an instance of it. Eclipse will give you a warning: The static field Animals.DOG should be accessed in a static way. –  Alvin Wong Dec 23 '12 at 14:42
    
@Koraktor Compiles fine. –  S.D. Dec 23 '12 at 14:43
    
@AlvinWong Updated with example. –  S.D. Dec 23 '12 at 14:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Members of an enum in Java are just like static fields of a class, so a1.DOG is simply the same as Animals.DOG.

public class EnumTest {
    enum Animals { DOG, FISH, GOAT };

    public void test(){
        Animals a1 = Animals.DOG;
        Animals a2 = a1.DOG; // the same as Animals.DOG, but makes code messy
        Animals a3 = a1.DOG.FISH; // WTF chaining???
    }
}

This doesn't only happen on enums, but also classes:

public class A {
    public static A a_1;
    public static A a_2;

    public void boo() {
        A a = A.a_1;
        A b = a.a_1; // That makes a equal to b!
        A c = a.a_1.a_2; // I HATE "CHAINING" LIKE THIS
    }
}

Just as @lichengwu has pointed out in his/her answer, enums will finally compile into a class with static fields, so this is not a problem of enums, but rather like the problem of classes.

In some other languages (for example C#) you are not allowed to reference a static member of a type through an instance of the type, but Java is an exception.

IMHO referencing a static member of a type through an instance of the type should be a bad habit. This causes confusion like you have pointed out.


If you like using the Eclipse IDE, it will simply give you a warning:

The static field Animals.DOG should be accessed in a static way

Eclipse also provides a few suggestions for you. One of them is to change to using the type to reference the enum member, and another one is to remove the "static modifier of the field" (but doesn't actually work on enums).

Addition:

Internal structure of what the Enumeration compiles to:

final class Animals extends java.lang.Enum<Animals> {
  public static final Animals DOG;
  public static final Animals FISH;
  public static final Animals GOAT;
  public static Animals[] values();
  public static Animals valueOf(java.lang.String);
  static {};
}
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So, A b = a.a_1.a_2 will compile ? –  S.D. Dec 23 '12 at 15:07
    
@Singularity yes that should work. –  Alvin Wong Dec 23 '12 at 15:09

Decompilation the Animals.class

javap Animals.class:

final class Animals extends java.lang.Enum<Animals> {
  public static final Animals DOG;
  public static final Animals FISH;
  public static final Animals GOAT;
  public static Animals[] values();
  public static Animals valueOf(java.lang.String);
  static {};
}

All types are Animals's instance, so you can reference other type.

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What you have demonstrated is a consequence of how Java handles enum types. Enum type constants are static references and not numerical primitives like in C. Since you can access static members of a type (in this case Animals) through an object/instance reference (Animals.DOG), you can always get to any other enum constant from any enum constant. The trick here is the static member is a reference to an instance of the type of which it is a member.

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enum creates its elements as static instances of this enum. In some cases these instances are subclasses of this enum.

Of course, you can access class methods and class instances (i.e. static) using objects.

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