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I've got a large library of Django apps that are shared by a handful of Django projects/sites. Within each project/site there is an option to define a 'Mix In' class that will be mixed in to one of the in-library base classes (which many models sub-class from).

For this example let's say the in-library base class is PermalinkBase and the mix-in class is ProjectPermalinkBaseMixIn.

Because so many models subclass from PermalinkBase, not all the methods/properities defined in ProjectPermalinkBaseMixIn will be utilitized by all of PermalinkBase's subclasses.

I'd like to write a decorator that can be applied to methods/properties within ProjectPermalinkBaseMixIn in order to limit them from running (or at least returning None) if they are accessed from a non-approved class.

Here's how I'm doing it now:

class ProjectPermalinkBaseMixIn(object):
    """
    Project-specific Mix-In Class to `apps.base.models.PermalinkBase`
    """

    def is_video_in_season(self, season):
        # Ensure this only runs if it is being called from the video model
        if self.__class__.__name__ != 'Video':
            to_return = None
        else:
            videos_in_season = season.videos_in_this_season.all()
            if self in list(videos_in_season):
                to_return = True
            else:
                to_return False

        return to_return

Here's how I'd like to do it:

class ProjectPermalinkBaseMixIn(object):
    """
    Project-specific Mix-In Class to `apps.base.models.PermalinkBase`
    """

    @limit_to_model('Video')
    def is_video_in_season(self, season):
        videos_in_season = season.videos_in_this_season.all()
        if self in list(videos_in_season):
            to_return = True
        else:
            to_return = False

        return to_return

Is this possible with decorators? This answer helped me to better understand decorators but I couldn't figure out how to modify it to solve the problem I listed above.

Are decorators the right tool for this job? If so, how would I write the limit_to_model decorator function? If not, what would be the best way to approach this problem?

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3  
Why do you want to do this?! –  ThiefMaster Dec 23 '12 at 15:33
1  
I think you have massively overcomplicated your design. A mix-in that only works on certain classes isn't a mix-in. Just make an abstract base class and then define that functionality in the class itself. (Presuming that it's shared functionality, in this case, it looks like it just needs to be a function on the given class). –  Lattyware Dec 23 '12 at 15:35
    
Also, what's with the Yoda logic? You check if it isn't true, then do what you want in the else case. –  Lattyware Dec 23 '12 at 15:36
    
@ThiefMaster The Video model above is used by 8 different projects but only one has the 'season' functionality. I don't want to cruft up the other projects by adding in that functionality which is why I'm adding that method to the project-specific mix-in. –  respondcreate Dec 23 '12 at 15:42
    
Ok... but the method being there in the mixin doesn't hurt and adding such a check just makes thing slower and uglier. Oh, and please don't use if foo: return True: else: return False. Just return foo or return bool(foo) if necessary in such a case! –  ThiefMaster Dec 23 '12 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

was looking at your problem and I think this might be an overcomplicated way to achieve what you are trying to do. However I wrote this bit of code:

def disallow_class(*klass_names):
    def function_handler(fn):
        def decorated(self, *args, **kwargs):
            if self.__class__.__name__ in klass_names:
                print "access denied to class: %s" % self.__class__.__name__
                return None
            return fn(self, *args, **kwargs)
        return decorated
    return function_handler


class MainClass(object):

    @disallow_class('DisallowedClass', 'AnotherDisallowedClass')
    def my_method(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print "my_method running!! %s" % self


class DisallowedClass(MainClass): pass

class AnotherDisallowedClass(MainClass): pass

class AllowedClass(MainClass): pass


if __name__ == "__main__":
    x = DisallowedClass()
    y = AnotherDisallowedClass()
    z = AllowedClass()
    x.my_method()
    y.my_method()
    z.my_method()

If you run this bit of code on your command line the output will be something like:

access denied to class: DisallowedClass
access denied to class: AnotherDisallowedClass
my_method running!! <__main__.AllowedClass object at 0x7f2b7105ad50>

Regards

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Brilliant! Thanks, @andrefsp...my knowledge of decorators has increased exponentially! Cheers! –  respondcreate Dec 24 '12 at 2:26

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