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In my application I have components that are linked to eachother using inputs and outputs. The data which will be exchanged can be of any type, so I use generics.

public interface IInputVariable<T>
{
    IOutputVariable<T> Source { get; set; }
}


public interface IOutputVariable<T>
{
    T Value { get; set; }
}

In another class, the Components are linked together. Which components are linked, are derived from a file. The class which does the linking has no knowledge about which type the input and output exchange. This class only wants to connect them with the following code:

IOutputVariable<double> output;
Type argumentType = output.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0];
IInputVariable<argumentType> input = new BasicInputVariable<argumentType>();
input.Source = output;

This code doesn't compile because argumentType can not be used as an generic argument. Is there a correct way to formulate this? Or is it possible to declare a generic variable without knowing its argument type?

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Would it help to use object for a type? object is the most generic type you can imagine. –  Mr Lister Dec 23 '12 at 16:04
5  
If your generic arguments aren't known at compile-time, then don't use generics. Otherwise you'll be stuck with a clumsy and hard to use type where using generics will provides no benefit. –  Allon Guralnek Dec 23 '12 at 16:11
1  
In other parts of the program, the generic arguments are known and the generics are really helpfull there. –  Tuur Dec 23 '12 at 16:13
1  
Based upon your code sample, the Input and Output must be of the same type since the same value for T is used for both interfaces. –  Trevor Pilley Dec 23 '12 at 16:24
2  
Actually, "IList<T>" does not implement IList. –  Eren Ersönmez Dec 23 '12 at 18:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simplest way to set Source property is create counstructor in BasicInputVariable<T> that takes IOutputVariable<T>:

public BasicInputVariable(IOutputVariable<T> source)
{
    Source = source;
}

Then you can easy instantiate it:

IOutputVariable<double> output;
Type argumentType = output.GetType().GetGenericArguments()[0];
object input = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(BasicInputVariable<>)
                                       .MakeGenericType(argumentType), output);

Another way is to create and implement an interface that can provide Source property:

public interface ISetSource
{
    object Source { get; set; }
}

public class BasicInputVariable<T> : IInputVariable<T>, ISetSource
{
    public IOutputVariable<T> Source { get; set; }

    object ISetSource.Source
    {
        get { return Source; }
        set { Source = (IOutputVariable<T>) value; }
    }
}

Now you can access the Source property:

IOutputVariable<double> output;
var input = (ISetSource) Activator.CreateInstance(typeof (BasicInputVariable<>)
                                                 .MakeGenericType(argumentType));
input.Source = output;

It could be more type-safe with in/out generic parameters, but unfortunately we can't use them with value-types...

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Caution: This is really ugly hack, not recommended..

If you have .NET 4.0:

IOutputVariable<double> output = something;
dynamic input = Activator
                .CreateInstance(typeof(BasicInputVariable<>)
                                .MakeGenericType(output
                                                 .GetType()
                                                 .GetGenericArguments()[0]));
//or may be:
//dynamic input = typeof(BasicInputVariable<>)
//                .MakeGenericType(output
//                                 .GetType()
//                                 .GetGenericArguments()[0])
//                .GetConstructor(new Type[0])
//                .Invoke(new object[0]);

input.Source = output;

But I dont understand what's preventing you from passing the type argument double itself directly to your BasicInputVariable constructor?

IOutputVariable<double> output = something;
IInputVariable<double> input = new BasicInputVariable<double>();
input.Source = output;

If type argument could be anything, then why not make the whole method generic? May be:

void Method<T>()
{
    IOutputVariable<T> output = something;
    IInputVariable<T> input = new BasicInputVariable<T>();
    input.Source = output;
}

This works since you have T the same for both input and output variable..


Its hard to think about a better solution without more detail, but seriously you should rethink your design in the first place.

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