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Suppose there is a 1-m relationship between Department and Employee which department can have many employees and one employee can be in only one department. I have depId as a foreign key in the Employee table. Below is how Entities looks like with setters and getters,

@Entity
public class Employee {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private Long empId;
    private String name;

    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name = "deptId")
    private Department dept;

    public Long getEmpId() {
        return empId;
    }
}



@Entity
public class Department {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private Long deptId;
    private String name;

    @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name = "deptId")
    @IndexColumn(name = "idx")
    private Set<Employee> listEmp;
}

Ealier Department has the attribute mappedBy and now both entities have joinColumn both entities are the owner of the relationship right?

My doubt is when i create Department first and then create a set of Employees and set the department i created and save the department object it works fine. But then i just try to Create a department and Create a Employee and set the department there and save the Employee object it gives me below exception.

Hibernate: insert into Employee (deptId, name) values (?, ?) Exception in thread "main" org.hibernate.TransientObjectException: object references an unsaved transient instance - save the transient instance before flushing: hello.domain.Department

Shouldn't it work both ways?

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2 Answers 2

Ealier Department has the attribute mappedBy and now both entities have joinColumn both entities are the owner of the relationship right?

Not right. Now, instead of having a OneToMany bidirectional association, you have two distinct unidirectional associations, that Hibernate tries to map using the same column, leading to unpredictable behavior.

You should use the mappedBy attribute on the one side.

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From http://docs.jboss.org/hibernate/annotations/3.5/reference/en/html_single/:

2.2.5.3.1.1. Bidirectional

Since many to one are (almost) always the owner side of a bidirectional relationship in the JPA spec, the one to many association is annotated by @OneToMany(mappedBy=...)

Followed by an example, followed by:

Troop has a bidirectional one to many relationship with Soldier through the troop property. You don't have to (must not) define any physical mapping in the mappedBy side.

To map a bidirectional one to many, with the one-to-many side as the owning side, you have to remove the mappedBy element and set the many to one @JoinColumn as insertable and updatable to false.

Note that there is always only one 'owning' side.

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thanks but the author of below article did so. thats why i confused. any particular reason which you can see, viralpatel.net/blogs/hibernate-one-to-many-annotation-tutorial –  FrankD Jan 1 '13 at 3:21

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