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I've been developing with Common Lisp for almost a year now, and this is really starting to get on my nerves. I started programming CL using CLISP, but I later switched over to SBCL for speed. I do a lot of rather low-level stuff, so I need to interface with a lot of C code. I really like the incremental development aspect of CL (I don't use Emacs however - I'm running SLIMV in Vim), but I find myself developing more slowly than I would in Python, Perl, C, or even NASM. The root of the problem lies in SBCL's error messages. I once was forced to search through almost 500 lines of code because SBCL decided to give me an ERROR: Invalid number of arguments on foreign function #< some memory address >. No designation of what function was called, no line number, nothing. More recently, I've had the delight of getting The loaded code expects an incompatible layout for class SB-PRETTY:PRETTY-STREAM. randomly. The code runs FINE on CLISP, but just fails with obscure errors on SBCL. Is there any way to make these messages somewhat more informative? I've been writing C and assembly for almost 6 years now, and even they will give you a line number. The only halfway reasonable SBCL errors I've seen have been reader errors, which are almost useless because they usually amount to a missing parenthesis. Again, is there any declaration/command line switch that can be used to change this? I'd even be okay with writing my own error printer at this point.

EDIT: An example, with (sb-ext:restrict-compiler-policy 'debug 3) in my ~/.sbclrc (using --load rather than --script so .sbclrc is loaded)

debugger invoked on a SB-INT:SIMPLE-PROGRAM-ERROR in thread
#<THREAD "main thread" RUNNING {AB09931}>:
  invalid number of arguments: 0

Type HELP for debugger help, or (SB-EXT:EXIT) to exit from SBCL.

restarts (invokable by number or by possibly-abbreviated name):
  0: [ABORT] Exit debugger, returning to top level.

(SB-KERNEL::INVALID-ARG-COUNT-ERROR-HANDLER
 #<unavailable argument>
 #.(SB-SYS:INT-SAP #XB78CDAE0)
 #<SB-ALIEN-INTERNALS:ALIEN-VALUE :SAP #XB78CD7DC :TYPE (*
                                                         (STRUCT
                                                          SB-VM::OS-CONTEXT-T-STRUCT))>
 (79))
0] print
(SB-KERNEL::INVALID-ARG-COUNT-ERROR-HANDLER
    #<unavailable argument>
    #.(SB-SYS:INT-SAP #XB78CDAE0)
    #<SB-ALIEN-INTERNALS:ALIEN-VALUE :SAP #XB78CD7DC :TYPE (*
                                                            (STRUCT
                                                             SB-VM::OS-CONTEXT-T-STRUCT))>
    (79))
0] down
(SB-KERNEL:INTERNAL-ERROR
    #.(SB-SYS:INT-SAP #XB78CD7DC)
    #<unavailable argument>)
1] down
("foreign function: #x805FCBB")
2] down

Bottom of stack.

Not exactly informative.

share|improve this question
    
Such questions are best asked on the SBCL mailing list. With example code, when possible. People who are maintaining the SBCL compiler are listening there. –  Rainer Joswig Dec 23 '12 at 20:09
    
Have you tried Clozure and their Objective C bridge? I haven't had too much of an issue with the error messages generated in that lisp implementation when communicating with Objective C routines. Which I know isn't C, but you might find inspiration there. –  Clayton Stanley Dec 24 '12 at 18:09
    
Also, with slimv, you are getting the debugger buffer yes, that shows the backtrace, that you can navigate around and see variable state, etc.? –  Clayton Stanley Dec 24 '12 at 18:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a common problem with distributions that "customise" the build script; Arch Linux is a regular offender. Installing binaries from sbcl.org is the most reliable method. It's fairly easy to then build from source if one wants the latest and greatest.

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I think you're looking for: (sb-ext:restrict-compiler-policy 'debug 3)

You can put it into your ~/.sbclrc or into your REPL, and SBCL's debugger (especially in SLIME) will produce much more useful results.

share|improve this answer

One more thing I've learned recently, and this may be useful in your situation:

  1. Make sure to compile everything with sufficient debug level.
  2. Wrap the code you suspect into (step ...) form. From there you can follow restarts, which you will recognize as being very similar to GDB and other step-debuggers (you can step-next, step-into, step-out and step-countinue) from there. It may be a bit tedious to get to the function you need, if you absolutely have no clue as to where it is coming from, but if you use it as a methodology, and test smaller pieces of code, it helps.

More info: http://www.sbcl.org/manual/#Single-Stepping

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If you get a run-time error (I suspect the invalid number of arguments falls in that category), you should drop into a debugger (unless you've explicitly disabled that) and a back-trace would, probably, show you exactly where the call was made.

The loaded code expects a different layout... indicates you are looking at two pieces of compiled code, compiled at different point in time, or code that is hooking a bit too deeply into the internals. First, force a recompilation of all your code and see if the warning goes away.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it drops me in a debugger, but the problem is that the invalid number of arguments is in a foreign function call, so the callstack is only 3 deep, the lowest of which is <foreign function whatever>. –  chameco Dec 23 '12 at 19:06

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