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I am a little perplexed about what is going on with my code, here is what I have so far:

function Person(name) {
    this.name = name;
}

Person.prototype.getName = this.name;
Person.prototype.displayName = function() {
    return this.name;
}


var Sethen = new Person("Sethen");

console.log(Sethen.getName);
console.log(Sethen.displayName());

I am curious as to why getName doesn't give me the this.name value and only logs blank, while the displayName method gives me the correct value. getName is a property of my prototype object, so my thought process was that I could grab it like this.

Why does getName not log the value of Sethen? How would I go about grabbing that information like a regular property? Must I use a method?

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If you're going to downvote give a reason. Contribute to this community constructively. –  Sethen Dec 31 '12 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because the value of this isn't what you think it is when that code is run. this is probably equal to the global object (i.e. window).

Since you're calling displayName and setting the context by prefixing it with an instance of the Person object, this is set correctly inside of the function and you get the person's name out.

Of course, you could always access the name property directly (Sethen.name).

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How would I go about grabbing that information like a regular property? Must I use a method? –  Sethen Dec 23 '12 at 16:34
1  
I believe so, yes, unless you define the property inside of the Person constructor. –  Andrew Whitaker Dec 23 '12 at 16:36
1  
Can't you call Sethen.name directly? –  spike Dec 23 '12 at 16:46
    
@spike sure, he can –  aliona Dec 23 '12 at 17:02
    
While @AndrewWhitaker answer is correct, this refers to the global object, you can call Sethen.name directly without tying it to a method. I was overwriting the local variable with something else in the prototype. –  Sethen Dec 23 '12 at 17:14

The issue is that getName is not a function, but a property that is assigned a value when Person.prototype.getName is first assigned before a Person object is ever constructed. So, there is no way that it could possibly contain the value of any particular Person object.

You simply cannot access instance data of an object at the time you are creating the prototype because no Person object exists yet and thus there is no instance data yet and thus this doesn't point to a Person object.

Instead, Person.prototype.getName = this.name; is assigning the prototype object a value of this.name which in your code is either window.name or in strict mode will cause an error because this will be undefined.

The prototype can be assigned functions or any data that already exists during your code initialization. Things assigned to the prototype will have the same value for all objects of that type that you create. This is why it's most useful to assign them functions/methods.

You could implement it this way to get the value of a given Person object:

function Person(name) {
    this.name = name;
}

Person.prototype.getName() = function() { 
    return this.name;
}

var Sethen = new Person("Sethen");

console.log(Sethen.getName());

The other option is to just access the .name property directly:

function Person(name) {
    this.name = name;
}
var Sethen = new Person("Sethen");
console.log(Sethen.name);
share|improve this answer
    
Or you could just call Sethen.name without tying it to a method. That's what I was looking for. –  Sethen Dec 23 '12 at 17:16
    
@SethenMaleno - yes, I was working towards that too and have added that to my answer now. –  jfriend00 Dec 23 '12 at 17:18

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