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I got some stupid problem, I don't know what am i doing wrong.

I wrote client and server, client is working properly. I checked that output stream works properly in client there are bytes, but in server when a client connected, method in.avaible() returns always zero? Why?

SOme code of my server:

            try{
            serverSocket = new ServerSocket(port);
        }
        catch (IOException e){
            System.err.println("Could not listen on port: " + port);
            return false;
        }
        System.out.println("Server Started");
        txtServer.setText("Server wystartował");
        return true;
        }
        else{
        txtPort.setText("Brak Portu!");
        txtPort.setBorder( BorderFactory.createLineBorder(Color.RED) );
        return false;}
    }

    @Override
    public void run() { 
        try{
            clientSocket = serverSocket.accept();
            data.clear();

            System.out.println("Client connected");
            cl_obs = new Client_obs(clientSocket, data);
            Thread t = new Thread(cl_obs);
            t.start();
        }
        catch (IOException e){
            System.err.println("Accept failed.");
            System.exit(1);
        }           


    }
          package Server;
          import java.io.IOException;
          import java.io.InputStream;
          import java.net.Socket;

          public class Client_obs implements Runnable {
      private InputStream in;
      private data data;
      private Socket clientSocket = null;
      public Client_obs(Socket cl, data data1){
        clientSocket =cl;
        data = data1;
    }
    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            in = clientSocket.getInputStream();
            byte[] data1 = new byte[in.available()];;           
            for (int i=0; i<data1.length; i++){
            data1[i] = (byte)in.read();
            }
            data.setData(data1);
            data.displayMSG(data.getdata());
            in.close();
            clientSocket.close();

        }
        catch(IOException e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
1  
Because the javadocs say that might happen. It also explicitly says not to do what you're doing. You may want to find a good example of reading from a socket in Java on the 'net. –  Brian Roach Dec 23 '12 at 16:40

3 Answers 3

That's a perfectly legal implementation.

Returns an estimate of the number of bytes that can be read (or skipped over) from this input stream without blocking by the next invocation of a method for this input stream. The next invocation might be the same thread or another thread. A single read or skip of this many bytes will not block, but may read or skip fewer bytes. Note that while some implementations of InputStream will return the total number of bytes in the stream, many will not. It is never correct to use the return value of this method to allocate a buffer intended to hold all data in this stream.

A subclass' implementation of this method may choose to throw an IOException if this input stream has been closed by invoking the close() method.

The available method for class InputStream always returns 0.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 - and it might be worth bolding the part that says never to do what he's doing (allocating a buffer) –  Brian Roach Dec 23 '12 at 16:39

You should look at the documentation of the available method. For some implementations its not possible to know the exact number of bytes available. Therefore 0 is a valid result for those implementations:

Note that while some implementations of InputStream will return the total number of bytes in the stream, many will not. It is never correct to use the return value of this method to allocate a buffer intended to hold all data in this stream.

...

The available method for class InputStream always returns 0.

share|improve this answer

Ok, I change it, but it's not working properly. Maybe I will show you my lient too:

Client

     public boolean ClientStart(){
    try{
        Socket = new Socket("localhost", port);
        out = new DataOutputStream(Socket.getOutputStream());
    }catch(UnknownHostException e){
        System.out.println("[Client]: Nieznany host");
    }catch(IOException e){
        System.out.println("[Client]: Nie można połączyć się z localhostem       na danym porcie");
    }
    finally{
    return true;    
    }
}
public void Send(byte[] data) throws IOException{   
    try{
        out.write(data);

    }
    catch(NullPointerException e){

    }
}
public void Disconnect() throws IOException{
    out.flush();
    out.close(); 
    Socket.close();
}

Server.

      public void run() {   
    try{
        clientSocket = serverSocket.accept();
        data.clear();

        System.out.println("Client connected");
        in = clientSocket.getInputStream();

        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        byte buffer[] = new byte[1024];
        for(int s; (s=in.read(buffer)) != -1; )
        {
          baos.write(buffer, 0, s);
        }
        byte result[] = baos.toByteArray();
    }
    catch (IOException e){
        System.err.println("Accept failed.");
        System.exit(1);
    }           

Still the result array is empty:/

share|improve this answer
    
It's just blocking at this for loop.. with reading buffer –  lechniak Dec 23 '12 at 22:21

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