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Still working on hw1 of the Coursera Scala course, I'm having trouble with case statements and tuples.

object Pascal {
    def main(args: List[String]) = {
        require((args length) == 2, "args length must equal 2")
          println("calling pascal on " + (args head) + " and " + (args last))
          pascal((args head) toInt, (args last) toInt)
    }
    def pascal(c: Int, r: Int): Int = {
        require(((r >= 0) && (c >= 0))
            && (c > r + 1), "r and c must be >= 0 and c must be <= r + 1")
        (c, r) match {
            case (_, 0) => 1
            case (0, _) => 1
            case (1 + r, _) => 1 // error: value not found "+"
            case (_, _) => pascal(r-1,c-1) + pascal(r-1,c-1)
        }
    }
}

Please tell me how to code this in Scala:

case (1 + r, _) => 1
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I believe you are looking for something like this:

case (v, _) if(v == r + 1) => 1

which will match any value of c (except for c == 0 which was matched previously) and then apply a test to check if v is equal to r + 1

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thanks man! I think that I want case (v, _) if (v > r + 1) though. I'll accept after a short walk –  Kevin Meredith Dec 23 '12 at 17:13
    
I hadn't looked through the whole functionality of the example, but the if statement will allow you to perform any test you need to. In looking at the whole thing, if you want to capture when c > r + 1, then I believe that you are correct. –  jcern Dec 23 '12 at 17:25
    
how would I add an else => 2? –  Kevin Meredith Dec 24 '12 at 5:57
1  
@Kevin, I am not entirely sure I understand what you are asking. If you are looking for an else statement, case (_, _) => 2 would seem to cover that, although you are already using that condition. The matches happen from the top down, so it is not specifically an else, but rather the first condition that matches. If you are looking to match an additional condition, you can just add another line after along the lines of: (v, _) if (v >= 2). –  jcern Dec 24 '12 at 14:56

You can also

val R = r+1
(c, r) match {
  case (0, _) => 1
  case (R, _) => 1
  case (_, _) => pascal(r-1, c-1) + pascal(r-1,c)
}

(Note that the recursion you have is wrong--you add the same entry twice!--and that case (_, 0) is unnecessary since if r is 0, either c is 0 (which is caught by its case), or c is r+1, which is caught by that case.)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, Rex. That makes sense. I was concerned by adding the val R = r+1 since there's 3 lines of scope between where R is initialized and then used, but I suppose it's trivial for this example. –  Kevin Meredith Dec 23 '12 at 20:22
    
FYI - it turns out the case, which you elegantly explained to me, isn't necessary. c must be <= r. –  Kevin Meredith Dec 24 '12 at 1:12

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