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Why does this code not work? It returns a key error for key3. adict has key3 and it doesn't seem different from how I have been adding keys to empty dictionaries, except that I am passing them between each other in a loop. How can I pass keys and values from one dictionary into a new one that has the same primary keys?

adict = {'key1':{'a':.078, 'b':1000, 'c':100},
                          'key2':{'a':.0645, 'b':10, 'c':5},
                          'key3':{'a':.0871, 'b':250, 'c':45},
                          'key4':{'a':.0842, 'b':200, 'c':37},
                          'key5':{'a':.054, 'b':409, 'c':82},
                          'key6':{'a':.055, 'b':350, 'c':60}}

another_dict = {}
for k in adict:
    another_dict[k]['transferred'] = adict[k]['b']


>>>   Traceback (most recent call last):
      File "C:\Python27\test.py", line 26, in <module>
        another_dict[k]['transferred'] = adict[k]['b']
      KeyError: 'key3'
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5 Answers 5

You have to create a new dictionary at another_dict[k] before accessing it:

adict = {'key1':{'a':.078, 'b':1000, 'c':100},
                      'key2':{'a':.0645, 'b':10, 'c':5},
                      'key3':{'a':.0871, 'b':250, 'c':45},
                      'key4':{'a':.0842, 'b':200, 'c':37},
                      'key5':{'a':.054, 'b':409, 'c':82},
                      'key6':{'a':.055, 'b':350, 'c':60}}

another_dict = {}
for k in adict:
    if k not in another_dict:
        another_dict[k] = {}
    another_dict[k]['transferred'] = adict[k]['b']
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If I understand correctly, it's fairly simple to use a dict comprehension:

>>> pprint({k:{'transferred':v['b']}  for k, v in adict.iteritems()})
{'key1': {'transferred': 1000},
 'key2': {'transferred': 10},
 'key3': {'transferred': 250},
 'key4': {'transferred': 200},
 'key5': {'transferred': 409},
 'key6': {'transferred': 350}}

You could also do a convenience function to only keep certain subkeys (if they're to be named the same)

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> def dict_with_subkeys(odict, *keys):
    return {k:dict(zip(keys, itemgetter(*keys)(odict[k]))) for k in odict}

>>> pprint(dict_with_subkeys(adict, 'a', 'c'))
{'key1': {'a': 0.078, 'c': 100},
 'key2': {'a': 0.0645, 'c': 5},
 'key3': {'a': 0.0871, 'c': 45},
 'key4': {'a': 0.0842, 'c': 37},
 'key5': {'a': 0.054, 'c': 82},
 'key6': {'a': 0.055, 'c': 60}}
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Problem is another_dict[k] actually doesn't exist yet and you're trying to do another_dict[k]['transferred'] on something that was not even initialized. So you need to initialize it first:

In [35]: adict = {'key1':{'a':.078, 'b':1000, 'c':100},
                          'key2':{'a':.0645, 'b':10, 'c':5},
                          'key3':{'a':.0871, 'b':250, 'c':45},
                          'key4':{'a':.0842, 'b':200, 'c':37},
                          'key5':{'a':.054, 'b':409, 'c':82},
                          'key6':{'a':.055, 'b':350, 'c':60}}

In [36]: another_dict={}

In [37]: for k in adict:
    another_dict[k]={}                          #initialize another_dict[k]
    another_dict[k]['transferred']=adict[k]['b']

In [38]: another_dict
Out[38]: 
{'key1': {'transferred': 1000},
 'key2': {'transferred': 10},
 'key3': {'transferred': 250},
 'key4': {'transferred': 200},
 'key5': {'transferred': 409},
 'key6': {'transferred': 350}}
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Using another_dict[k]['transferred'], you are trying to access the 'transferred' key for dict of key k, which is not yet created.

You can use defaultdict here: -

from collections import defaultdict
another_dict = defaultdict(dict)

Modified code: -

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> adict = {'key1':{'a':.078, 'b':1000, 'c':100},
...                           'key2':{'a':.0645, 'b':10, 'c':5},
...                           'key3':{'a':.0871, 'b':250, 'c':45},
...                           'key4':{'a':.0842, 'b':200, 'c':37},
...                           'key5':{'a':.054, 'b':409, 'c':82},
...                           'key6':{'a':.055, 'b':350, 'c':60}}
... 
... another_dict = defaultdict(dict)
... for k in adict:
...     another_dict[k]['transferred'] = adict[k]['b']

>>> another_dict
5: defaultdict(<type 'dict'>, {'key3': {'transferred': 250}, 
                           'key2': {'transferred': 10}, 
                           'key1': {'transferred': 1000}, 
                           'key6': {'transferred': 350}, 
                           'key5': {'transferred': 409}, 
                           'key4': {'transferred': 200}})
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Don't forget from collections import defaultdict –  David Robinson Dec 23 '12 at 17:14

Thanks @Ashwini I understand your point. and @Jon as well.

As I get better at Python and ("Dictionary Comprehensions"?), another solution I found is this:

another_dict = {k:{'b':adict[k]['b']} for k in adict}
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I guess you need to use this : {k:{'transferred':adict[k]['b']} for k in adict} –  Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 23 '12 at 17:59
    
@AshwiniChaudhary I noticed that - but prefer the .iteritems() approach to make the value lookup a bit more explicit, but anyhow... –  Jon Clements Dec 23 '12 at 18:08

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