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I am looking for a way to convert a long string (from a dump), that represents hex values into a byte array.

I couldn't have phrased it better than the person that posted the same question here:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Programming_Languages/Java/Q_21062554.html

But to keep it original, I'll phrase it my own way: suppose I have a string "00A0BF" that I would like interpreted as the byte[] {0x00,0xA0,0xBf} what should I do?

I am a Java novice and ended up using BigInteger and watching out for leading hex zeros. But I think it is ugly and I am sure I am missing something simple...

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20 Answers 20

up vote 265 down vote accepted

Here's a solution that I think is better than any posted so far:

public static byte[] hexStringToByteArray(String s) {
    int len = s.length();
    byte[] data = new byte[len / 2];
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i += 2) {
        data[i / 2] = (byte) ((Character.digit(s.charAt(i), 16) << 4)
                             + Character.digit(s.charAt(i+1), 16));
    }
    return data;
}

Reasons why it is an improvement:

  • Safe with leading zeros (unlike BigInteger) and with negative byte values (unlike Byte.parseByte)

  • Doesn't convert the String into a char[], or create StringBuilder and String objects for every single byte.

Feel free to add argument checking via assert or exceptions if the argument is not known to be safe.

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2  
Can you give an example that is decoded incorrectly, or explain how it's wrong? –  Dave L. Apr 17 '11 at 14:35
2  
It doesn't work for the String "0". It throws an java.lang.StringIndexOutOfBoundsException –  ovdsrn Jun 8 '11 at 20:06
19  
"0" is not valid input. Bytes require two hexidecimal digits each. As the answer notes, "Feel free to add argument checking...if the argument is not known to be safe." –  Dave L. Jun 9 '11 at 16:42
6  
javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(hexString) seems to be about 20% faster than the above solution in my micro tests (for whatever little they are worth), as well as correctly throwing exceptions on invalid input (e.g. "gg" is not a valid hexString but will return -77 using the solution as proposed). –  increment1 Apr 4 '12 at 18:31
1  
@MuhammadAnnaqeeb See other answers below that use BigInteger or Byte.parseByte –  Dave L. Mar 19 at 18:03

One-liners:

import javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter;

public static String toHexString(byte[] array) {
    return DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(array);
}

public static byte[] toByteArray(String s) {
    return DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(s);
}
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The Hex class in commons-codec should do that for you.

http://commons.apache.org/codec/

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4  
This also looks good. See org.apache.commons.codec.binary.Hex.decodeHex() –  Dave L. Sep 26 '08 at 17:46
    
It was interesting. But I found their solution hard to follow. Does it have any advantages over what you proposed (other than checking for even number of chars)? –  rafraf Sep 27 '08 at 1:06

The HexBinaryAdapter provides the ability to marshal and unmarshal between String and byte[].

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.adapters.HexBinaryAdapter;

public byte[] hexToBytes(String hexString) {
     HexBinaryAdapter adapter = new HexBinaryAdapter();
     byte[] bytes = adapter.unmarshal(hexString);
     return bytes;
}

That's just an example I typed in...I actually just use it as is and don't need to make a separate method for using it.

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4  
It works only if the input string (hexString) has an even number of characters. Otherwise: Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: hexBinary needs to be even-length: –  ovdsrn Jun 8 '11 at 20:15
2  
Oh, thanks for pointing that out. A user really shouldn't have an odd number of characters because the byte array is represented as {0x00,0xA0,0xBf}. Each byte has two hex digits or nibbles. So any number of bytes should always have an even number of characters. Thanks for mentioning this. –  GrkEngineer Jun 16 '11 at 15:54
5  
You can use java.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(hexString) directly instead of using HexBinaryAdapter (which in turn calls DatatypeConverter). This way you do not have to create an adapter instance object (since DatatypeConverter methods are static). –  increment1 Apr 4 '12 at 18:33
    
it works for me, thanks –  Hector Dec 1 at 20:52

Actually, I think the BigInteger is solution is very nice:

new BigInteger("00A0BF", 16).toByteArray();

Edit: Not safe for leading zeros, as noted by the poster.

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I also thought so initially. And thank you for documenting it - I was just thinking I should... it did some strange things though that I didn't really understand - like omit some leading 0x00 and also mix up the order of 1 byte in a 156 byte string I was playing with. –  rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 16:43
1  
That's a good point about leading 0's. I'm not sure I believe it could mix up the order of bytes, and would be very interested to see it demonstrated. –  Dave L. Sep 26 '08 at 16:55
1  
yeah, as soon as I said it, I didn't believe me either :) I ran a compare of the byte array from BigInteger with mmyers'fromHexString and (with no 0x00) against the offending string - they were identical. The "mix up" did happen, but it may have been something else. I willlook more closely tomorrow –  rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 17:09
2  
The issue with BigInteger is that there must be a "sign bit". If the leading byte has the high bit set then the resulting byte array has an extra 0 in the 1st position. But still +1. –  Gray Oct 28 '11 at 16:20

Here is a method that actually works (based on several previous semi-correct answers):

private static byte[] fromHexString(final String encoded) {
    if ((encoded.length() % 2) != 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Input string must contain an even number of characters");

    final byte result[] = new byte[encoded.length()/2];
    final char enc[] = encoded.toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < enc.length; i += 2) {
        StringBuilder curr = new StringBuilder(2);
        curr.append(enc[i]).append(enc[i + 1]);
        result[i/2] = (byte) Integer.parseInt(curr.toString(), 16);
    }
    return result;
}

The only possible issue that I can see is if the input string is extremely long; calling toCharArray() makes a copy of the string's internal array.

EDIT: Oh, and by the way, bytes are signed in Java, so your input string converts to [0, -96, -65] instead of [0, 160, 191]. But you probably knew that already.

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Thanks Michael - you're a life saver! Working on a BlackBerry project and trying to convert a string representation of a byte back into the byte ... using RIM's "Byte.parseByte( byteString, 16 )" method. Kept throwing a NumberFormatExcpetion. Spent hours tyring to figure out why. Your suggestion of "Integer.praseInt()" did the trick. Thanks again!! –  BonanzaDriver Oct 23 '11 at 19:28

One-liners:

import javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter;

public static String toHexString(byte[] array) {
    return DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary(array);
}

public static byte[] toByteArray(String s) {
    return DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(s);
}

For those of you interested in the actual code behind the One-liners from FractalizeR (I needed that since javax.xml.bind is not available for Android (by default)), this comes from com.sun.xml.internal.bind.DatatypeConverterImpl.java :

public byte[] parseHexBinary(String s) {
    final int len = s.length();

    // "111" is not a valid hex encoding.
    if( len%2 != 0 )
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("hexBinary needs to be even-length: "+s);

    byte[] out = new byte[len/2];

    for( int i=0; i<len; i+=2 ) {
        int h = hexToBin(s.charAt(i  ));
        int l = hexToBin(s.charAt(i+1));
        if( h==-1 || l==-1 )
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("contains illegal character for hexBinary: "+s);

        out[i/2] = (byte)(h*16+l);
    }

    return out;
}

private static int hexToBin( char ch ) {
    if( '0'<=ch && ch<='9' )    return ch-'0';
    if( 'A'<=ch && ch<='F' )    return ch-'A'+10;
    if( 'a'<=ch && ch<='f' )    return ch-'a'+10;
    return -1;
}

private static final char[] hexCode = "0123456789ABCDEF".toCharArray();

public String printHexBinary(byte[] data) {
    StringBuilder r = new StringBuilder(data.length*2);
    for ( byte b : data) {
        r.append(hexCode[(b >> 4) & 0xF]);
        r.append(hexCode[(b & 0xF)]);
    }
    return r.toString();
}
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You can now use BaseEncoding in guava to accomplish this.

BaseEncoding.base16().decode(string);

To reverse it use

BaseEncoding.base16().encode(bytes);
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EDIT: as pointed out by @mmyers, this method doesn't work on input that contains substrings corresponding to bytes with the high bit set ("80" - "FF"). The explanation is at Bug ID: 6259307 Byte.parseByte not working as advertised in the SDK Documentation.

public static final byte[] fromHexString(final String s) {
    byte[] arr = new byte[s.length()/2];
    for ( int start = 0; start < s.length(); start += 2 )
    {
        String thisByte = s.substring(start, start+2);
        arr[start/2] = Byte.parseByte(thisByte, 16);
    }
    return arr;
}
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1  
Close, but this method fails on the given input "00A0BBF". See bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6259307. –  Michael Myers Sep 26 '08 at 15:34
1  
Also strangely it does not deal with "9C" –  rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 15:58
1  
@mmyers: whoa. That's not good. Sorry for th confusion. @ravigad: 9C has the same problem because in this case the high bit is set. –  Blair Conrad Sep 26 '08 at 16:37

I've always used a method like

public static final byte[] fromHexString(final String s) {
    String[] v = s.split(" ");
    byte[] arr = new byte[v.length];
    int i = 0;
    for(String val: v) {
        arr[i++] =  Integer.decode("0x" + val).byteValue();

    }
    return arr;
}

this method splits on space delimited hex values but it wouldn't be hard to make it split the string on any other criteria such as into groupings of two characters.

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The string concatenation is unnecessary. Just use Integer.valueOf(val, 16). –  Michael Myers Sep 26 '08 at 15:21
    
I've tried using the radix conversions like that before and I've had mixed results –  pfranza Sep 26 '08 at 15:23
    
You mean it converted incorrectly? –  Michael Myers Sep 26 '08 at 15:27
    
thanks - oddly it works fine with this string: "9C001C" or "001C21" and fails with this one: "9C001C21" Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "9C001C21" at java.lang.NumberFormatException.forInputString(Unknown Source) –  rafraf Sep 26 '08 at 16:07

The Code presented by Bert Regelink simply does not work. Try the following:

import javax.xml.bind.DatatypeConverter;
import java.io.*;

public class Test
{  
    @Test
    public void testObjectStreams( ) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException
    {     
            ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
            ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);

            String stringTest = "TEST";
            oos.writeObject( stringTest );

            oos.close();
            baos.close();

            byte[] bytes = baos.toByteArray();
            String hexString = DatatypeConverter.printHexBinary( bytes);
            byte[] reconvertedBytes = DatatypeConverter.parseHexBinary(hexString);

            assertArrayEquals( bytes, reconvertedBytes );

            ByteArrayInputStream bais = new ByteArrayInputStream(reconvertedBytes);
            ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(bais);

            String readString = (String) ois.readObject();

            assertEquals( stringTest, readString);
        }
    }
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1  
This is a different problem really, and probably belongs on another thread. –  Sean Coffey Nov 8 '12 at 19:48

The BigInteger() Method from java.math is very Slow and not recommandable.

Integer.parseInt(HEXString, 16)

can cause problems with some characters without converting to Digit / Integer

a Well Working method:

Integer.decode("0xXX") .byteValue()

Function:

public static byte[] HexStringToByteArray(String s) {
    byte data[] = new byte[s.length()/2];
    for(int i=0;i < s.length();i+=2) {
        data[i/2] = (Integer.decode("0x"+s.charAt(i)+s.charAt(i+1))).byteValue();
    }
    return data;
}

Have Fun, Good Luck

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I like the Character.digit solution, but here is how I solved it

public byte[] hex2ByteArray( String hexString ) {
    String hexVal = "0123456789ABCDEF";
    byte[] out = new byte[hexString.length() / 2];

    int n = hexString.length();

    for( int i = 0; i < n; i += 2 ) {
        //make a bit representation in an int of the hex value 
        int hn = hexVal.indexOf( hexString.charAt( i ) );
        int ln = hexVal.indexOf( hexString.charAt( i + 1 ) );

        //now just shift the high order nibble and add them together
        out[i/2] = (byte)( ( hn << 4 ) | ln );
    }

    return out;
}
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I found Kernel Panic to have the solution most useful to me, but ran into problems if the hex string was an odd number. solved it this way:

boolean isOdd(int value)
{
    return (value & 0x01) !=0;
}

private int hexToByte(byte[] out, int value)
{
    String hexVal = "0123456789ABCDEF"; 
    String hexValL = "0123456789abcdef";
    String st = Integer.toHexString(value);
    int len = st.length();
    if (isOdd(len))
        {
        len+=1; // need length to be an even number.
        st = ("0" + st);  // make it an even number of chars
        }
    out[0]=(byte)(len/2);
    for (int i =0;i<len;i+=2)
    {
        int hh = hexVal.indexOf(st.charAt(i));
            if (hh == -1)  hh = hexValL.indexOf(st.charAt(i));
        int lh = hexVal.indexOf(st.charAt(i+1));
            if (lh == -1)  lh = hexValL.indexOf(st.charAt(i+1));
        out[(i/2)+1] = (byte)((hh << 4)|lh);
    }
    return (len/2)+1;
}

I am adding a number of hex numbers to an array, so i pass the reference to the array I am using, and the int I need converted and returning the relative position of the next hex number. So the final byte array has [0] number of hex pairs, [1...] hex pairs, then the number of pairs...

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public static byte[] hex2ba(String sHex) throws Hex2baException {
    if (1==sHex.length()%2) {
        throw(new Hex2baException("Hex string need even number of chars"));
    }

    byte[] ba = new byte[sHex.length()/2];
    for (int i=0;i<sHex.length()/2;i++) {
        ba[i] = (Integer.decode(
                "0x"+sHex.substring(i*2, (i+1)*2))).byteValue();
    }
    return ba;
}
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Based on the op voted solution, the following should be a bit more efficient:

  public static byte [] hexStringToByteArray (final String s) {
    if (s == null || (s.length () % 2) == 1)
      throw new IllegalArgumentException ();
    final char [] chars = s.toCharArray ();
    final int len = chars.length;
    final byte [] data = new byte [len / 2];
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i += 2) {
      data[i / 2] = (byte) ((Character.digit (chars[i], 16) << 4) + Character.digit (chars[i + 1], 16));
    }
    return data;
  }

Because: the initial conversion to a char array spares the length checks in charAt

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At least in my case, this solution worked the best, and I believe it's more elegant than using BigInteger to parse string.

"111111\n222322\n333333\n".getBytes("UTF-8")
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Your solution does not answer the question posted. –  rafraf Mar 15 '13 at 0:53

For Me this was the solution, HEX="FF01" then split to FF(255) and 01(01)

private static byte[] BytesEncode(String encoded) {
    //System.out.println(encoded.length());
    byte result[] = new byte[encoded.length() / 2];
    char enc[] = encoded.toUpperCase().toCharArray();
    String curr = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < encoded.length(); i=i+2) {
        curr = encoded.substring(i,i+2);
        System.out.println(curr);
        if(i==0){
            result[i]=((byte) Integer.parseInt(curr, 16));
        }else{
            result[i/2]=((byte) Integer.parseInt(curr, 16));
        }

    }
    return result;
}
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This question has been answered for a while and has several good alternatives in place; unfortunately, your answer does not provide any significantly improved value at this point. –  rfornal Dec 6 at 1:10

I think will do it for you. I cobbled it together from a similar function that returned the data as a string:

private static byte[] decode(String encoded) {
    byte result[] = new byte[encoded/2];
    char enc[] = encoded.toUpperCase().toCharArray();
    StringBuffer curr;
    for (int i = 0; i < enc.length; i += 2) {
        curr = new StringBuffer("");
        curr.append(String.valueOf(enc[i]));
        curr.append(String.valueOf(enc[i + 1]));
        result[i] = (byte) Integer.parseInt(curr.toString(), 16);
    }
    return result;
}
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First, you shouldn't need to convert the string to uppercase. Second, it is possible to append chars directly to a StringBuffer, which should be much more efficient. –  Michael Myers Sep 26 '08 at 15:48

Non of Odd hex string is correct. Check source from you get this string . It is because of truncation of string due to limit no of characters. If String is image is stored in database then retrieve it using program not using any tools

I was having same problem with .net and MSSQL and by using webservice and Java Client I tried all conversion and library including axis and util jpg.

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I'm sorry, I can't make heads or tails of the advice you're trying to give here. It doesn't help answer the question which is why I've voted down. Thanks. –  sarnold Jun 26 '13 at 0:51

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