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When writing unit tests, I always extends Assert, so I have unqualified access to the many calls to the many Assert.assertXXX methods:

For example:

public class MyTestClass extends Assert {
    @Test
    public void SomeTest() {
        assertNotNull(""); // instead of Assert.assertNotNull("");
    }
}

Extending Assert saves me typing Assert.assertNotNull("");. The Assert. clutters up the code in my opinion, because you use it a lot.

My test classes rarely need to extend another class, and if they do I tend to make the superclass extend Assert.

However, it feels like I'm breaking some coding style to extend just to avoid importing and qualifying.

It this "poor" coding style?
Is it is still "best practice" code if I do this, because it's only a test class?

Edit:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

Doesn't work because have my Eclipse code formatter resolve all imports, so such a line gets zapped and replaced with individual imports for all methods actually used every time I save, leaving me to re-import if I use a new assert method.

Admittedly, after a while of coding a test class the need to import new methods reduces, but when coding a new test class it's a hassle.

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If you don't want replacement .* with individual imports - you can set it in Eclipse preferences, like in my answer. –  Xeon Dec 23 '12 at 20:00
    
@xeon But you can't set it conditionally, and it's best practice to leave it turned on –  Bohemian Dec 23 '12 at 20:31

6 Answers 6

No, do it like this:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

public class MyTestClass {
   @Test
   public void SomeTest() {
       assertNotNull("");
   }
}
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static import doesn't work for me - see edit in answer –  Bohemian Dec 23 '12 at 19:05
    
Then use import static org.junit.Assert.assertNotNull; –  asgoth Dec 23 '12 at 19:09
    
That's fine for that method (Eclipse converts the .* to the individual methods used) - what about all the other ones? –  Bohemian Dec 23 '12 at 19:15
    
Add them in the same way. It requires some manual copy/pasting of import statements but that 2 seconds work. –  asgoth Dec 23 '12 at 19:16
    
thats what im trying to avoid by doing this –  Bohemian Dec 23 '12 at 19:33

Personally I don't like extending classes if I don't need to. Have you considered using static import of the Methods you're using? On a side note I'd recommend trying Fest assertions for nicer, more readable tests.

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It is poor style to extend a class unless polymorphism is needed. Doing so is similar to what Sun calls the Constant Interface Antipattern. As you can see on that page, static import statements were added to the language specifically to prevent it.

Personally, I just write Assert.assertNotNull(value). It's not a lot of typing and I don't feel it hurts readability.

If you insist on using unqualified methods, you should be importing each and every method with a static import, because an import statement that ends with "*" is considered poor style as well. If anyone else comes along to maintain your code (or if you come back after six months to look at it), an import ending with "*" will require the maintainer to do some detective work to figure out where a method is coming from, whereas explicit imports make it immediately clear where the method comes from.

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I had the same issue - but it's easy to resolve:

Use as the others say:

import static org.junit.Assert.*;

public class MyTestClass {
   @Test
   public void SomeTest() {
       Assert.assertNotNull("");
   }
}

Here goes the most important part:

And go to: Window->Preferences, Java->Code Style->Organize Imports, "Number of static imports needed for .* (e.g. 'java.lang.Math.*'):" -> change to 0.

Now your code formatter will not change ".*" imports to "single class" imports.

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Or if you are not a fan of '.*'-imports:

Import static org.junit.Assert;

public class MyTestClass {
   @Test
   public void SomeTest() {
      Assert.assertNotNull("");
   }
}
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first of all: you are asking this question so you too can see your way is wrong :) as everyone told you it should be done with static import. that's the right way. period.

the right question is how to make eclipse helping you instead of interfere. there are at least two ways. first you can set thresholds when eclipse should expand import xxx.*. just change it and you can have your xxx.* other way is to add assertions to your context assist. this way eclipse will propose you usage of your assertions without necessity of importing them first.

and the my way: don't use junit assertions. use fest assert 2.0. you can just static import xxx.assertThat and that's it.

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