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So what I'm trying to do is convert double to rational number. I check how many digits there is after decimal point and I want to save the number 123.456 as 123456 / 1000, for example.

public Rational(double d){      
    String s = String.valueOf(d);
    int digitsDec = s.length() - 1 - s.indexOf('.');        

    for(int i = 0; i < digitsDec; i++){
        d *= 10;
    }

    System.out.println((int)d); //checking purposes
}   

However, for the number 123.456 I get a round off error and the result is 123455. I guess it'd be possible to fix this with BigDecimal but I can't get it to work. Also, having calculated what rational number it would be, I would like to call another constructor with parameters (int numerator, int denominator) but I can't obviously call the constructor in the line where println is now. How should I do this?

share|improve this question
1  
wouldn't it be simpler to just count the location of the dot and then remove (string replace) the dot from the string? – Asaf Dec 23 '12 at 19:49
1  
Can't you just put all the decimals from behind the dot in front of it while also counting the amount of numbers you took? Remove the dot, parse everything back to int and create a 2nd int using 10 times the amount of numbers you took? – Jeroen Vannevel Dec 23 '12 at 19:51
2  
Slightly offtopic, but o you know that any rational number has an infinite number of fractional representations? One option would be searching for the canonical fraction, but that is slightly more complicated of what you are trying to do. – SJuan76 Dec 23 '12 at 19:53
    
Also off topic, but you may want to consider some rounding algorithm. For instance, a double can't represent 1/10 exactly, but I'm not sure if you'd want to represent the rational number 0.1000000000000000055511151231257827021181583404541015625. Alternatively, as you mention, you could just use BigDecimal. – yshavit Dec 23 '12 at 20:26
up vote 4 down vote accepted

For the first part of the question, Java is storing .6 as .5999999 (repeating). See this output:

(after first multiply): d=1234.56
(after second multiply): d=12345.599999999999
(after third multiply): d=123455.99999999999

One fix is to use d = Math.round(d) immediately after your loop finishes.

public class Rational {

     private int num, denom;

     public Rational(double d) {
          String s = String.valueOf(d);
          int digitsDec = s.length() - 1 - s.indexOf('.');        

          int denom = 1;
          for(int i = 0; i < digitsDec; i++){
             d *= 10;
             denom *= 10;
          }
          int num = (int) Math.round(d);

          this.num = num; this.denom = denom;
     }

     public Rational(int num, int denom) {
          this.num = num; this.denom = denom;
     }

     public String toString() {
          return String.valueOf(num) + "/" + String.valueOf(denom);
     }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
          System.out.println(new Rational(123.456));
     }
}

It works - try it.

For the second part of your question...

In order to call the second constructor from the first, you can use the "this" keyword

this(num, denom)

But it has to be the very first line in the constructor... which doesn't make sense here (we have to do some calculations first). So I wouldn't bother trying to do that.

share|improve this answer
    
Multiplying by 10.0 didn't change the result. – Neutrino Dec 23 '12 at 19:59
    
Regarding the second part: probably I didn't state my problem precisely enough. I've got two constructors: first with the parameter (double d), another with (int num, int denom). In the first one I want to convert double number to fraction and call the second constructor. – Neutrino Dec 23 '12 at 20:08
    
Java is storing your double 123.456 as 123455.999999 after you finish multiplying by 10. One way to get the proper value is to round here. – ktm5124 Dec 23 '12 at 20:29
    
See my revised post - I tested it and got 123456/1000 as my standard output. – ktm5124 Dec 23 '12 at 20:40
    
Thanks a lot, it's fine now. – Neutrino Dec 23 '12 at 21:08

This code may be overkill for you, but it deals with the rounding error that you're experiencing, and it also takes care of repeating decimals (4.99999999999999 turns into 5, and 0.33333333333333333333 turns into 1/3).

public static Rational toRational(double number){
return toRational(number, 8);
}

public static Rational toRational(double number, int largestRightOfDecimal){

long sign = 1;
if(number < 0){
    number = -number;
    sign = -1;
}

final long SECOND_MULTIPLIER_MAX = (long)Math.pow(10, largestRightOfDecimal - 1);
final long FIRST_MULTIPLIER_MAX = SECOND_MULTIPLIER_MAX * 10L;
final double ERROR = Math.pow(10, -largestRightOfDecimal - 1);
long firstMultiplier = 1;
long secondMultiplier = 1;
boolean notIntOrIrrational = false;
long truncatedNumber = (long)number;
Rational rationalNumber = new Rational((long)(sign * number * FIRST_MULTIPLIER_MAX), FIRST_MULTIPLIER_MAX);

double error = number - truncatedNumber;
while( (error >= ERROR) && (firstMultiplier <= FIRST_MULTIPLIER_MAX)){
    secondMultiplier = 1;
    firstMultiplier *= 10;
    while( (secondMultiplier <= SECOND_MULTIPLIER_MAX) && (secondMultiplier < firstMultiplier) ){
        double difference = (number * firstMultiplier) - (number * secondMultiplier);
        truncatedNumber = (long)difference;
        error = difference - truncatedNumber;
        if(error < ERROR){
            notIntOrIrrational = true;
            break;
        }
        secondMultiplier *= 10;
    }
}

if(notIntOrIrrational){
    rationalNumber = new Rational(sign * truncatedNumber, firstMultiplier - secondMultiplier);
}
return rationalNumber;
}

This provides the following results (results from test cases are shown as comments):

Rational.toRational(110.0/3.0); // 110/3
Rational.toRational(11.0/1000.0); // 11/1000
Rational.toRational(17357.0/33300.0); // 17357/33300
Rational.toRational(215.0/21.0); // 215/21
Rational.toRational(0.123123123123123123123123); // 41/333
Rational.toRational(145731.0/27100.0); // 145731/27100
Rational.toRational(Math.PI); // 62831853/20000000
Rational.toRational(62.0/63.0); // 62/63
Rational.toRational(24.0/25.0); // 24/25
Rational.toRational(-24.0/25.0); //-24/25
Rational.toRational(-0.25333333333333333333333); // -19/75
Rational.toRational(-4.9999999999999999999999); // -5
Rational.toRational(4.9999999999999999999999);  // 5
Rational.toRational(123.456); // 15432/125
share|improve this answer

It's not elegant but I believe this does what your asking;

double a = 123.456;
String aString = Double.toString(a);        
String[] fraction = aString.split("\\.");

int denominator = (int)Math.pow(10, fraction[1].length());
int numerator = Integer.parseInt(fraction[0] + "" + fraction[1]);

System.out.println(numerator + "/" + denominator);
share|improve this answer

Here, d=123.456 then num=123456, j=1000

public Rational(double d){      
  double temp =d;
  int j=1, num;
  do{
     j=j*10;
     }while((temp*j)%10==0);        
  j=j/10;
  num=(int)(d*j);
  System.out.println(num);
  System.out.println(j);
}   
share|improve this answer

Try

for(int i = 0; i <= digitsDec; i++){

}
share|improve this answer
    
I want to convert from number 123.456 to 123456. When I change to i <= digitsDec I get a number 1234559. – Neutrino Dec 23 '12 at 20:01

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