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Given variables a, b:

b = 3

a = b++

a = --b

How do you write this correctly in Python?

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closed as not constructive by Jakub Hampl, Jon Clements, Mr E, Celada, Brooks Moses Dec 24 '12 at 5:02

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In python a statement doesn't return anything. also b++ is invalid in python. –  undefined is not a function Dec 23 '12 at 20:09

3 Answers 3

From The Zen of Python:

Explicit is better than implicit

So, let's write:

b = 3
a = b; b +=1
b -= 1; a = b
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There are no increment/decrement (++/--) operators in Python. This is because integers in Python are immutable (can't be modified, only reassigned). So let's break this down and emulate their behavior.

What does b++ do? It evaluates to b, then increments b. Therefore, we write this as:

a = b
b += 1

Now onto --b. It decrements b, then evaluates to the new value of b. In Python:

b -= 1
a = b

Put it all together and we get:

b = 3
a = b
b += 1
b -= 1
a = b
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In Python, you cannot do b++. There is no plus plus.

There is the operator +=, so you could this kind of stuff:

b = 3

b += 1

b -= 1

Or simply:

b = 3

a = b + 1

a = b - 1
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