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I have problem with Django templates. I want to create a base html, which I will use to display posts. I call a template from view, which includes an html file, where the file extends the base html.

view

def main(request):
    all_posts = News.objects.all()
    return render_to_response("index.html", {'all_posts': all_posts})

template -- index.html

<div id="content">
    {% include 'content.html' with posts=all_posts%}
</div>

content.html

{% extends "content_base.html" %}

{% for post in posts %}
    {% block date_of_post %} {{ post.date }} {% endblock %}
    {% block post_author %} {{ post.author }} {% endblock %}
    {% block post %} {{ post.content }} {% endblock %}
{% endfor %}

content_base.html

<div class="post">
    <h2 class="title"><a href="#">{% block blabla %}{% endblock %}</a></h2>
    <p class="meta"><span class="date">{% block date_of_post %}{% endblock %}</span><span class="posted">Posted by <a href="#">{% block post_author %}{% endblock %}</a></span></p>
    <div style="clear: both;">&nbsp;</div>
    <div class="entry">
        <p>
            {% block post %} {% endblock %}
        </p>    
        <p class="links">
            <a href="#" class="more">Read More</a>
            <a href="#" title="b0x" class="comments">Comments</a>
        </p>
    </div>
</div>

But it seems like I cannot pass the *all_posts* variable to content.html. What is the problem here? Am I doing something wrong?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should move the loop into index.html, and include content_base.html directly. So index.html becomes:

<div id="content">
    {% for post in posts %}
        {% include 'content_base.html' %}
    {% endfor %}
</div>

and content_base.html is

<div class="post">
    <h2 class="title"><a href="#">{{ post.title }}</a></h2>
    <p class="meta"><span class="date">{{ post.date }}</span><span class="posted">Posted by <a href="#">{{{ post.author }}</a></span></p>
    <div style="clear: both;">&nbsp;</div>
    <div class="entry">
        <p>
            {{ post.content }}
        </p>    
        <p class="links">
            <a href="#" class="more">Read More</a>
            <a href="#" title="b0x" class="comments">Comments</a>
        </p>
    </div>
</div>
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There is still {% endblock %} tag left in your content_base.html please remove it. –  Aamir Adnan Dec 23 '12 at 22:03
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You're using blocks with identical names, because you're using them in a loop:

{% for post in posts %}
    {% block date_of_post %} {{ post.date }} {% endblock %}
    {% block post_author %} {{ post.author }} {% endblock %}
    {% block post %} {{ post.content }} {% endblock %}
{% endfor %}

You can't do that. Look here.

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Sometimes too much normalization is not so good. You can simply have index.html and all of your code can go there (avoiding unnecessary blocks).

<div id="content">
    {% for post in all_posts %}
        <div class="post">
            <h2 class="title"><a href="#">{{post.title}}</a></h2>
            <p class="meta"><span class="date">{{post.date}}</span><span class="posted">Posted by <a href="#">{{post.post_author}}</a></span></p>
            <div style="clear: both;">&nbsp;</div>
            <div class="entry">
                <p>
                    {{post.content}}
                </p>    
                <p class="links">
                    <a href="#" class="more">Read More</a>
                    <a href="#" title="b0x" class="comments">Comments</a>
                </p>
            </div>
        </div>
    {% endfor %}
</div>
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Thanks for the tip, but I'm going to use the content_base.html in a huge number of pages, so I have to do it like this way ;) –  mtndesign Dec 24 '12 at 6:50
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