Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How could I, on the fly, remove spaces entered into a textbox while the person is typing?

share|improve this question
1  
What kind of textbox? HTML + JS? Swing? WFC? –  lutz Sep 9 '09 at 19:10
    
@lutz: Look at the tagz. It's probably HTML + JS. –  Lucas Sep 9 '09 at 19:12
1  
What about blocking the space key altogether? –  Crescent Fresh Sep 9 '09 at 19:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted
$(function() {
  var txt = $("#myTextbox");
  var func = function() {
    txt.val(txt.val().replace(/\s/g, ''));
  }
  txt.keyup(func).blur(func);
});

You have to additionally handle the blur event because user could use context menu to paste ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Regular expressions are slow. Handling the blur-event is not needed if you bind your logic to the keyup-event. –  roosteronacid Sep 9 '09 at 21:01
1  
Belay that. The blur event is a smart move :) –  roosteronacid Sep 9 '09 at 21:07
2  
@roosteronacid the speed of regular expressions in this case is inconsequential. –  Justin Johnson Sep 9 '09 at 21:18
1  
I didn't say your code will blow up--it's neat and tidy, and I like it. I guess it's just a matter of opinion. When it comes to JavaScript, I like to create code that runs as fast as possible. Considering that this is a knowledgebase for novice -as well as experienced programmers, why not try to dish out some best-practices while your at it? –  roosteronacid Sep 9 '09 at 21:42
2  
@roosteronacid It's not a matter of opinion, the regexp is faster than your code. See my answer. –  Justin Johnson Sep 9 '09 at 21:58

This ridiculousness about regular expressions being slow/bad for this task needs to be put the the test. This may not be the most accurate benchmark, but it will do to illustrate my point.

// Modified roosteronacid's example to consider all whitespace characters
function sanitizer(s) {
    var a = s.split(""),
        i = a.length,
        r = "";

    while (i) {
        i--;
        if (a[i] !== " " || a[i] !== "\t" || a[i] !== "\r" || a[i] !== "\n" || a[i] !== "\f" || a[i] !== "\v") {
            r += a[i];
        }
    }

    return r;
}

// Regular expression method wrapped in a function to incur the same overhead
function regexp(s) {
  return s.replace(/\s+/g, '');
}

var iterations = 10000;
// 1024 characters or good meausure
var text = "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Mauris luctus tristique ante, ac suscipit tortor consequat at. Fusce id tortor quis felis faucibus dignissim. Pellentesque viverra pellentesque eros, ac sagittis quam cursus a. Nullam commodo mauris eget nisi luctus vitae ultricies leo volutpat. Morbi quis quam id elit accumsan semper. Praesent aliquam aliquam tortor vel vulputate. Nulla adipiscing ipsum vitae est luctus imperdiet. Suspendisse potenti. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Vivamus at urna ut leo ornare commodo. Quisque eros dolor, adipiscing quis malesuada quis, molestie nec lectus. Quisque et odio nibh. Integer mattis tincidunt ligula, eu scelerisque erat posuere non. Sed ipsum quam, fringilla id porttitor ac, placerat quis nunc. Praesent sodales euismod ultricies. In porta magna metus. Morbi risus risus, hendrerit sit amet ultrices eu, interdum placerat massa. Nunc at leo dui. Morbi eu nunc mi, at ullamcorper felis. Duis et metus metus. ";

var s = new Date();
for ( var i=0; i<iterations; ++i ) {
  sanitizer(text);
}

console.log((new Date()).getTime() - s.getTime());

var s = new Date();
for ( var i=0; i<iterations; ++i ) {
  regexp(text);
}

console.log((new Date()).getTime() - s.getTime());

Results of 8 executions:

# Initial times
sanitizer: 5137, 8927, 8817, 5136, 8927, 5132, 8807, 8804
regexp:    1275, 1271, 1480, 1278, 1274, 1308, 1270, 1270

# Dropped highest and lowest values
sanitizer: 5137, 8817, 5136, 8927, 8807, 8804
regexp:    1275, 1271, 1278, 1274, 1308, 1270

# Averages
sanitizer: (5137 + 8817 + 5136 + 8927 + 8807 + 8804) / 6 = 7604.66667
regexp:    (1275 + 1271 + 1278 + 1274 + 1308 + 1270) / 6 = 1279.33333

Turns out using regular expressions is 594% faster.

See Josh Stodola answer for the implementation.

Edit: I notice that roosteronacid's method has changed; however, using r as an array makes it even slower.

share|improve this answer
1  
well put. Was going to do the same thing. (I added a link to your answer. Hope you don't mind.) –  seth Sep 9 '09 at 22:00
    
Thanks, not a problem. –  Justin Johnson Sep 9 '09 at 22:02
    
One possible explanation is that the regexp implementation has been carefully optimised. Another great example of using a standard library (or in this case language feature) rather than rolling your own. –  Tom Leys Sep 10 '09 at 2:18
    
That's highly likely. I haven't seen any comparisons lately between JavaScript native code and interpreted code, but we'd likely see similar results. –  Justin Johnson Sep 10 '09 at 5:03
    
+1 for doing the benchmarks. I was going to do this, but did not have the time. Whats-his-name needed to see this answer! –  Josh Stodola Sep 10 '09 at 13:15

on the fly? Perhaps on every keypress event, take the string in the textbox

$('#id').val($.trim($('#id').val());

This will remove any extraneous spaces in front and back.

share|improve this answer

You could try it like this:

$("input").keypress(function (e) {
   $(this).val($(this).val().replace(' ',''));
}
share|improve this answer
    
No need to waste performance, wrapping "this" in a jQuery object. We are after all talking about inputs. Both a textarea and an input has got the .value property. –  roosteronacid Sep 9 '09 at 21:03

I use following code:

<input type="text" onkeyup="fixme(this)" onblur="fixme(this)"/>

function fixme(element) {
 var val = element.value;
 var pattern = new RegExp('[ ]+', 'g');
 val = val.replace(pattern, '');
 element.value = val;
}

the regexp line contains what i want replaced... i have for number only fields:

var pattern = new RegExp('[^0-9]+', 'g');
share|improve this answer
    
Right-click paste? –  Josh Stodola Sep 9 '09 at 19:19
    
add it on the onblur as well –  Niko Sep 9 '09 at 19:51
    
-1 for obtrusiveness –  Justin Johnson Sep 9 '09 at 22:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.