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How to round a number to n decimal places in Java

I want to set a specified number of decimal digits in a float (or double), with a method in this form

public float decimalDigits(int x, float n){
....
}

for example

->if I have

float n1=36.58529

the line

float n2=decimalDigits(2, n1);

should return

n2=36.59

->if n1 is:

float n1=36.58329

the line

float n2=decimalDigits(2, n1);

should return

n2=36.58

the line

float n2=decimalDigits(1, n2);

should return

n2=36.6

etc

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by EJP, Siddharth Lele, Brooks Moses, Dante is not a Geek, Gagravarr Dec 24 '12 at 5:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Are you aware that float and double don't store their values in decimal but in binary? Arbitrary decimal numbers can't be stored exactly in a float or double, so you will get representation errors (meaning that the actual value will be slightly bigger or smaller than the value you intended to store). Knowing this, are you sure that this is what you want to do? –  Mark Byers Dec 24 '12 at 0:43
    
You can find more info about formatting floats here: stackoverflow.com/questions/703396/… –  tcb Dec 24 '12 at 3:20
1  
The solution of Silverstorm works. Thanks everybody. –  AndreaF Dec 24 '12 at 3:36
    
No it doesn't. See here for proof. –  EJP Dec 24 '12 at 4:56
3  
@EJP You have linked the proof that your solution doesn't works, not the proof that there aren't possible solution to meet the question problem –  Silverstorm Dec 24 '12 at 5:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use this

public float decimalDigits(int decimaldigits, float x){
            final NumberFormat numFormat = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance();
            numFormat.setMaximumFractionDigits(decimaldigits);
            final String resultS = numFormat.format(x);
            String parsable=resultS.replace(".", "");
            parsable=resultS.replace(",", ".");
            float ris=Float.parseFloat(parsable);
            return ris;
        }

I have added the String replacement to the code to avoid Parsing issue caused by the dot convention (for example 1234.34 becomes 1.234,34 after the formatting causing error in reparsing in float)

If the your is simply a format visualization problem, you could also use the String and doesn't matter that floating point variables don't have decimal places, so this is another valid method:

public String decimalDigits(int decimaldigits, float x){
        final NumberFormat numFormat = NumberFormat.getNumberInstance();
        numFormat.setMaximumFractionDigits(decimaldigits);
        final String resultS = numFormat.format(x);
        return resultS;
    }

If someone has doubts about validity of this solution, should ask for details or try to compile the code and test it before downvote, thanks. The code is tested and works like a charm.

WARNING

Clearly you have to pass float because the method use Float.parseFloat, if you want to pass a double you have to use a cast to float before pass it in the method, otherwise you have to change all the method primitive and parse from float to double. Double and float are different.

share|improve this answer
    
The first version doesn't work, and the second version doesn't even compile. A method declared as returning a float cannot return a String. -1 –  EJP Dec 24 '12 at 2:37
2  
@EJP Question edited. In the second version, clearly I have forgot to edit the first version from float to String, now the code compile and works. In the first version the issue was caused by a little problem with the dot convention, with a String replace works fine. I have tested it and works fine. –  Silverstorm Dec 24 '12 at 3:13
    
I would recommend you to read stackoverflow.com/questions/703396/… –  tcb Dec 24 '12 at 3:17
2  
@tcb if you try the code this works –  Silverstorm Dec 24 '12 at 3:18
1  
@EJP Your post proof that the scientific evidence is that you wasn't able to solve the problem operating directly with the float, not that the also my solution is wrong. –  Silverstorm Dec 24 '12 at 5:18

It is impossible for a routine that returns a float or a double to return correctly rounded values such as 36.59 or 36.6 because these values are not representable in binary floating-point. Binary floating-point can only return values that are close, such as 36.60000000000000142108547152020037174224853515625. There is no bit pattern in binary floating-point that represents the value 36.6.

If you want decimal values, you must use a decimal radix, such as DecimalFormat or BigDecimal.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the only correct answer. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 24 '12 at 1:47
2  
My solution works and answers the question... you can try using Eclipse. Despite floating point variables are saved has binary, you can manipulate float with numFormat and meet the problem easily. –  Silverstorm Dec 24 '12 at 3:30
2  
@EJP Has I have said, your answer is a wrong answer, because assume the problem is unsolvable. Your post is off-topic, you have posted a link to a your method, this prof that you wasn't able to meet the problem, NOT that there isn't any possible solution. I have tried the solution and works, My question was accepted, and the class NumberFormat with the parsing approx the value rightly so... what is your problem?? If you are particularly curious to test and aren't convinced, could try by yourself to test MY METHOD and report any problem that you find relative to the proposed solutions. –  Silverstorm Dec 24 '12 at 5:38
1  
0.01 becomes 0.0 that is right... yet tried a minute ago if you pass float the method works, –  AndreaF Dec 24 '12 at 5:42
2  
@EJP Tested if I pass float 0.01 with 1 decimal digit returns float 0.0 that is right, If I pass float 0.05 returns float 0.1 that is right. etc. –  Silverstorm Dec 24 '12 at 5:53

Possible pseudo code is below:

public class test {

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(decimalDigits(10.09872, 4));
    }

     static double decimalDigits(double value, int n)
    {
        double decimal = value - ((int) value);
        System.out.println(decimal);

        double short_decimal = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            /* current digit on decimal */
            decimal = decimal * 10;
            System.out.println(decimal);
            short_decimal += (Math.pow(10, n - i - 1) * (int)decimal);

            /* find further */
            decimal = decimal - (int)decimal;
        }

        return (int)value + (double)(short_decimal / Math.pow(10, n));
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
This technique does not work. -1 –  EJP Dec 24 '12 at 2:37
    
'Seems like it is working' isn't the same as 'working'. Binary fractions cannot represent decimal fractions to a specific number of decimal places except in a small number of cases where they coincide. –  EJP Dec 24 '12 at 4:31
    
The above technique works. You are just over complicating the stuff. This is not about how floating point is representing internally, he just wanted a method that could reduce the decimal places. –  User 104 Dec 24 '12 at 18:12

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