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I have a simple python function performing itertools product function. As seen below.

def cart(n, seq):
    import itertools
    b = 8
    while b < n:
        n = n - 1
        for p in itertools.product(seq, repeat=n):
            file.write(''.join(p))
            file.write('\n')

The function works but it is extremely slow. It is not even using a noticeable amount of resources. I was wondering if the bottle neck was the disk write speed? currently the the script is averaging at 2.5 mb per second. I also attempted this to a solid state drive and recieved the same speeds which leads me to believe the write speed is not the bottle neck. Is there a way to speed this function up and use more system resources? or is itertools just slow? Forgive me I am new to python.

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7  
How long does it take to execute if you don't write to a file but instead generate and discard the strings? –  Mark Byers Dec 24 '12 at 0:49
1  
note: product() generates len(seq)**n items i.e., the number grows exponentially (very fast) with n. Also you could write the while loop as: for m in range(n, b, -1) and use repeat=m-1. Also move import itertools outside the function. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 24 '12 at 2:51
    
thank you for your suggestions i used the for loop as well to improve my code –  John K Dec 25 '12 at 3:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can profile your code to get an idea of the location of the bottleneck. The following will create a file called "cart_stats.txt" with the profiling information in it. Running it myself seems to indicate that most of the time is being spent calling file.write().

from cProfile import Profile
from pstats import Stats
prof = Profile()
prof.disable()

file = open('cart_output.txt', 'wt')

def cart(n, seq):
    import itertools
    b = 8
    while b < n:
        n = n - 1
        for p in itertools.product(seq, repeat=n):
            file.write(''.join(p))
            file.write('\n')

prof.enable()
cart(10, 'abc')
prof.disable()

prof.dump_stats('cart.stats')
with open('cart_stats.txt', 'wt') as output:
    stats = Stats('cart.stats', stream=output)
    stats.sort_stats('cumulative', 'time')
    stats.print_stats()

file.close()
print 'done'

FWIW, the slowness seems to be overwhelmingly due the calls to file.write() itself, because it's still there even if I open() the output stream with a huge buffer or make it a StringIO instance. I was able to significantly reduce that by optimizing and minimizing the calls to it as shown below:

def cart(n, seq):
    import itertools
    b = 8
    write = file.write  # speed up lookup of method
    while b < n:
        n = n - 1
        for p in itertools.product(seq, repeat=n):
            write(''.join(p)+'\n')  # only call it once in loop

Which proves that having a profiler in place can be the best way to know where to spend your time and get the most benefit.

Update:

Here's a version that stores all output generated in memory before making a single file.write() call. It is significantly faster than using StringIO.StringIO because it's less general, but however is still not quite as fast as using a cStringIO.StringIO instance.

file = open('cart_output.txt', 'wt')

def cart(n, seq):
    from itertools import product
    buflist = []
    append = buflist.append
    b = 8
    while b < n:
        n = n - 1
        for p in product(seq, repeat=n):
            append(''.join(p))
    file.write('\n'.join(buflist)+'\n')

file.close()
share|improve this answer
    
At one point someone posted to use cStringIO this really solved my problem but I always used the profiles to analyze both ouputs –  John K Dec 25 '12 at 3:23
    
Yes, based on the limited profiling results I got, it seemed like the answer suggesting the use of cStringIO would likely help so I didn't repeat it to my answer -- strangely the answer suggesting it now seems to have disappeared. I posted mine anyway since I wasn't sure whether you were familiar with cProfile or not, because using it would at least tell your where the bottlenneck was occurring. Given that, it's strange that using a SSD didn't fix the problem...guess it must be OS overhead or something. –  martineau Dec 25 '12 at 5:19
    
@JohnK: In simple cases it might be enough to call: python -mcProfile your_script.py without modifying the source code. Does cStringIO faster than a file opened with a large buffer in your case? You could also try tempfile.SpooledTemporaryFile (until a threshold it doesn't use a disk file) as an intermediate solution between keeping all data in memory and writing it to a disk file at once. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 26 '12 at 11:19
    
@J.F.Sebastian would tempfile.SpooledTemporaryFile() work better than cStringIO if I have already set a limit for cStringIO. I need to look further into your suggestion but it seems that SpooledTemporaryFile() has a built in threshold would make my current application much faster. –  John K Dec 27 '12 at 19:01
1  
@JohnK: What do performance measurements show? –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 27 '12 at 20:43

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