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I have an array of float elements and I'm trying to remove elements that are close to each other. I.e. if there are two elements less than 0.4 apart (e.g. 15.1 and 15.3), I want to remove the second one. The 0.4 should be the input parameter for the algorithm.

The array is already sorted in a specific order (not ascending/descending) and I need to preserve that order.

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closed as not a real question by Mitch Wheat, wal, KooKiz, SztupY, Sean Owen Dec 24 '12 at 15:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
My advice would be: Please show what you have attempted... –  Mitch Wheat Dec 24 '12 at 3:17
1  
Should the second element in a close pair be removed even if the first element is also a candidate for removal? –  Ben Voigt Dec 24 '12 at 3:19
    
whathaveyoutried.com ? –  MadSkunk Dec 24 '12 at 3:21
1  
apparently nothing..... –  Mitch Wheat Dec 24 '12 at 3:35
3  
If you have { 15.1, 15.3, and 15.6 }, what gets removed? –  280Z28 Dec 24 '12 at 4:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have created an ApproximateFloatComparer class as follows:

public class ApproximateFloatComparer : IComparer<float>
{
    public float Range { get; set; }

    public ApproximateFloatComparer(float range)
    {
        this.Range = range;
    }

    public int Compare(float x, float y)
    {
        if (x - this.Range < y && x + this.Range > y)
            return 0;
        else return x.CompareTo(y);
    }
}

Then create a method to deduplicate:

public static List<float> Deduplicate(List<float> floats, float range)
{
    var dedup = new List<float>();
    var comparer = new ApproximateFloatComparer(range);
    foreach (var @float in floats)
        if (!dedup.Any(f => comparer.Compare(f, @float) == 0))
            dedup.Add(@float);
    return dedup;
}

Then combine it all:

var floats = new List<float>() { 5, 8, 2, 13, 6, 9, 4, 3, 2.1f, 8.6f, 2.2f };
floats = Deduplicate(floats, 0.4f);
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Wonderful. Worked for me. Thank you very much, Jason. –  Alec Bryte Dec 24 '12 at 16:28

Through a simple while, using List<float> instead of array, with an extension method:

public static void Deduplicate(this List<float> values, float delta, int decimals)
{
    int index = 0;
    while (index < values.Count)
    {
        float value = values[index];

        int i = index + 1;
        while (i < values.Count)
        {
            if (Math.Round(Math.Abs(value - values[i]), decimals) < delta)
                values.RemoveAt(i);
            else
                ++i;
        }
        ++index;
    }
}

and use it:

List<float> values = new List<float> { 3.4f, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1.2f, 2.5f, 3.6f, 1 };
values.Deduplicate(0.4f, 5);//       { 3.4f, 1, 2,    4,       2.5f          }
values.Deduplicate(0.4f, 10);//      { 3.4f, 1, 2, 3, 4,       2.5f          }
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Thanks, Konstantin. This is a great solution for in-place filtering. –  Alec Bryte Dec 24 '12 at 16:30

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