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This is the program I have:

from sys import argv

script, arg1 = argv

def program(usr_input, arg1):
    if(usr_input == arg1):
        print "CLI argument and user input are identical"

    else:
        print "CLI argument and user input aren't identical"

if arg1 != "":
    usr_input = raw_input("enter something: ")
    program(usr_input, arg1)

else:
    print "You have not entered a CLI argument at all."

I get:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "filename.py", line 3, in <module>
    script, arg1 = argv
ValueError: need more than 1 value to unpack

How can I detect the lack of command line argument and throw an error/exception instead of receiving this error?

share|improve this question
4  
argv's just an array of args... so check how long it is. –  Marc B Dec 24 '12 at 3:32
3  
Consider a minimal test-case: a, b = ["oops"] Why does this not work? How would it be fixed/avoided? –  user166390 Dec 24 '12 at 3:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would recommend just checking the program args in the __main__ location of your script, as an entry point to the entire application.

import sys

def program(*args):
    # do whatever
    pass

if __name__ == "__main__":
    try:
        arg1 = sys.argv[1]
    except IndexError:
        print "Usage: myprogram.py <arg1>"
        sys.exit(1)

    # start the program
    program(arg1)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I like this answer better. Was using IndexError instead of ValueError a personal choice or is there a significant reason? –  Nanda Dec 24 '12 at 5:54
    
Also, I think program(arg1) at the end of the code doesn't need indentation. –  Nanda Dec 24 '12 at 5:56
1  
Yes IndexError is needed when you are indexing only one element (1 in this case) instead of unpacking a wrong number of args. You only had one arg so I used that approach. Also yes the indent is required. This is a python idiom for creating a script that can be both imported from another script or run as an executable. If you dont indent that last line it will run code if you ever import this. –  jdi Dec 24 '12 at 15:56

You can handle the exception:

In [6]: def program(argv):
    try:
        script, argv1 = argv
    except ValueError:
        print("value error handled")
   ...:         

In [7]: program(argv)
value error handled
share|improve this answer
    
What is this syntax: In [6]? or did you mean in line 6 or something like that? –  Nanda Dec 24 '12 at 5:50
    
Its from the ipython interpreter and replaces >>>. It does read like in line. –  drewverlee Dec 24 '12 at 7:13
    
Oh! I forgot about being able to write functions in python command line. ipython seems cool too. Thanks –  Nanda Dec 24 '12 at 8:03

You could use a try statement there:

#!/usr/bin/env python
#-*- coding:utf-8 -*-

import sys

class MyError(Exception):
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.error_string = value

    def __str__(self):
        return eval(repr(self.error_string))

try:
    script, arg1 = sys.argv

except ValueError:     
    raise MyError, "Not enough arguments"
share|improve this answer
2  
Typically it is frowned upon to make custom exception subclasses that just pass and do nothing else. The standard library has an abundance of descriptive exceptions to raise. But other than that, I would vote this up for just being the simply approach in the global space. Try to parse args, and catch and print error and exit. –  jdi Dec 24 '12 at 3:46
    
@jdi thanks for the info –  X.Jacobs Dec 24 '12 at 3:57

Seeing that sys.argv is a list you should check the length of the list to make sure it is what you wish it to be. Your script with minor changes to check the length:

from sys import argv

def program(usr_input, arg1):
    if(usr_input == arg1):
        print "CLI argument and user input are identical"
    else:
        print "CLI argument and user input aren't identical"

if len(argv)== 2:
    arg1 = argv[1]
    usr_input = raw_input("enter something: ")
    program(usr_input, arg1)
else:
    print "You have not entered a CLI argument at all."
share|improve this answer

try this:

script = argv[0]
try:
    arg1 = argv[1]
except:
    arg1 = ''
share|improve this answer

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